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Behavioral Medicine Pioneers Honored


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    By Alex Bassil
    UM News

    weiss-gellman

    Stephen M. Weiss, and Marc D. Gellman

    CORAL GABLES, Fla. (December 8, 2016)—Stephen M. Weiss, Ph.D., M.P.H., professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Miller School of Medicine, and Marc D. Gellman, Ph.D., research associate professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences, were honored last week by the International Congress of Behavioral Medicine for their contributions to the interdisciplinary field that combines medicine and psychology.

    Weiss, who is widely considered one of the founders of the field, received the ICBM’s Lifetime Achievement Award on December 7 at the ICBM’s 14th Congress in Melbourne, Australia. He has served as president of both the international society and the Society of Behavioral Medicine (USA).

    “I’m not old enough for such an honor,” he joked when asked about the award, adding, “Well, perhaps approaching 80 means if you will ever receive such an honor from your colleagues, maybe sooner is better than later.”

    Gellman, was honored with the Distinguished Career Contribution Award for his widely acknowledged contributions to the development of behavioral medicine, which is particularly relevant today, given that many illnesses, like diabetes and lung cancer, are often caused by behavior. He is editor-in-chief of the Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine and a former board member of both the USA and international societies.

    In expressing his gratitude for the award, Gellman said, “It means so much to me to be acknowledged by my international colleagues. This award would not be possible without the exceptional contribution of so many members of the International Society of Behavioral Medicine.”

    The international congress attracts global experts in behavioral medicine and related disciplines to foster research collaborations that contribute to the science and practice of behavioral medicine.

     

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