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James Galway Named Presidential Scholar

The world renown flautist  joins the Frost School of Music 

UM News

GalwayCORAL GABLES, Fla. (March 6, 2017) – Sir James Galway, the internationally acclaimed flautist from Belfast, Northern Ireland, is joining the Frost School of Music as a Distinguished Presidential Scholar, as part of an initiative introduced by UM President Julio Frenk.

“Sir James Galway is a world-class artist and educator who enriches our world through the power of music. The University of Miami is honored to welcome him as one of its inaugural Distinguished Presidential Scholars. Students from the Frost School of Music and from our entire community will benefit greatly from his creativity, proficiency, and dedication,” said Frenk.

As an endowed talent, Galway will conduct his first Master Class on March 9 with Trudy Kane, associate professor of flute at the Frost School of Music.

“We are so delighted to welcome Sir James Galway to the Frost flute studio,” Kane said. “It is a thrilling opportunity for our flute students and the entire Frost community. We look forward to interacting with him and learning from his lifetime of experience.”

As a Distinguished Presidential Scholar, Galway will instill his talents in various settings, including performances and lectures, among the students, faculty and staff. Regarded for his diverse talents as an interpreter of the classical flute repertoire, Galway is also noted as an entertainer with the ability to span generations and genres.

“This is the most exciting thing happening to me since I left the Berlin Philharmonic,” Galway said. “I am looking forward to sharing all the experience I have had in the last 40 years with the students and faculty of this distinguished school.”

“Sir James Galway is one of the greatest musicians of our time, who embodies a panoply of Frost School ideals—performance at the highest level of artistry, breadth of style, dazzling stage presence, entrepreneurship, and citizenship. It is a thrill to have his imprint on our students, faculty, and culture,” said Shelly Berg, dean of the Frost School of Music.

One of the most highly regarded musicians in the world, Galway has sold more than 30 million recordings worldwide and has collaborated with artists such as Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Joni Mitchell, and Sir Elton John. His musical talents can also be heard throughout television and film soundtracks, including “The Lord of the Rings.”

“The idea of introducing new talent is to infuse our environment with the world’s best thinkers and doers,” said Berg. “And Sir James Galway is certainly fitting to take on the role.”

 

 

 

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Dean of Students Heads to Lehigh University

UM News

Ricardo Hall

Ricardo Hall

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 22, 2017)—Ricardo Hall, who helped create extraordinary student experiences for thousands of University of Miami students during his 11 years as associate vice president for student affairs and dean of students, has been named vice provost for student affairs at Lehigh University, a private research university in Pennsylvania.

Hall, who will assume his new duties on June 30, will lead one of Lehigh’s largest divisions, which includes the Dean of Students Office, the Health and Wellness Center, University Counseling and Psychological Services, Health Advancement and Prevention Strategies, the Women’s Center, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Pride Center, and the ROTC.

Calling Hall’s pending departure “bittersweet,” Vice President for Student Affairs Patricia A. Whitely lauded his leadership, logistical expertise, professional accomplishments, and “calming presence” during student crises. She said her longtime colleague is well suited to take on his new role at Lehigh, which has been counted among the nation’s “Hidden Ivies”—schools that rival the Ivy Leagues.

“Ric is a wonderful role model for our students. He is always willing to have a conversation with a student about any issue or concern and demonstrates the highest level of integrity,” Whitely said. “His leadership has truly impacted UM and we will always be grateful. We wish him well and know the Lehigh community is indeed fortunate.”

A bowtie aficionado known among students for his wise counsel, humor, racquetball challenges, and impressive PEZ collection, Hall said it was his good fortune to “have spent the past 11 years at a top-tier university, working with exceptional students, and alongside skilled and caring colleagues.

“I also don’t take for granted that I’ve served with a vice president for student affairs who is universally regarded as one of the nation’s best,” he said of Whitely. “My time at UM has certainly helped prepare me to embrace this significant leadership opportunity at Lehigh.”

Tapped into the Iron Arrow Honor Society in 2012, Hall joined UM in 2006, after 10 years in student affairs roles at Wake Forest University in North Carolina and Clemson University in South Carolina. In addition to overseeing UM’s Greek life, the chaplain’s office, alcohol and drug education, judicial affairs, veteran student services, and the 24-hour crisis response team, he is an adjunct faculty member in the School of Education and Human Development, and a trusted advisor to Student Government and the Committee on Student Organizations.

Under his leadership, Whitely said, the U’s Greek system more than doubled and the Sandler Center for Alcohol and Drug Education received a $1 million endowment for the Posner Substance Abuse Education Fund.

Hall earned both his bachelor’s degree in business management and his master’s in higher education administration from Ohio University and his doctorate in educational leadership from Clemson. A frequently requested speaker, he has presented locally, regionally, and nationally on such subjects as mentoring, student discipline, diversity, leadership skills development, Greek Life, and wellness.

“From his previous role, we know that he can work across divisions and across colleges to continue to develop and sustain a Lehigh student experience that is truly distinctive,” Lehigh Provost Pat Farrell said in announcing Hall’s appointment, which followed a national search.

Added Anne Anderson, an associate professor in the Perella Department of Finance who chaired Lehigh’s search committee, “The fact that he was already known to many in the Student Affairs division was very telling. They knew of his work, his accomplishments, and his reputation, and they were very enthused at the prospect of working with him. He is someone who is interested in the personal development of the students, as well as the professionals working for him.”

UM will now begin its own national search for Hall’s successor.

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Renowned Photographer Shares Talents

The University of Miami welcomes renowned photojournalist and documentarian Susan Meiselas as a Distinguished Presidential Fellow and 100 Talent.

By Andrew Boryga
UM News

S

Susan Meiselas

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 10, 2016)— Susan Meiselas has traveled the world as a documentary photographer for over 40 years.

Her photography has transported people to the rubble and destruction of lower Manhattan on 9/11, to Nicaragua’s popular insurrection during the late 1970s, to a village in El Salvador destroyed by the country’s armed forces in the early 1980s, and to witness the photographic history of Kurdistan, which was presented in book and exhibition form in 1997.

Meiselas said she believes documentary photography is “an engagement with the world.” Now she will share that engagement, her experience, and her talent with the University of Miami community as one of its 100 Talents, one of the University’s Roadmap to Our New Century initiatives,introduced by President Julio Frenk.

As a Distinguished Presidential Fellow with the College of Arts and Sciences, Meiselas is actively engaging and interacting with students and collaborating with faculty across multiple disciplines. Her visit will culminate in a public lecture at the Newman Alumni Center on March 21.

So far, Meiselas’s time on campus has found her in photography and sculpture classrooms in the College’s art department, where she has shared her expertise on topics such as the history of war photography and how to make a living as an artist.

Meiselas said she hopes to help inspire photography students by answering questions and sharing her own experiences. But above all, she hopes to encourage them to get out, take risks, and not be afraid to make mistakes, while moving from skills training to working on their own in-depth projects.

“You only truly learn by doing it yourself,” she said.

The challenge for photographers, she added, is to help viewers of their work become engaged with people and issues that may be foreign to them.

To welcome Meiselas to campus, the College and the School of Communication hosted a special screening of her 1991 documentary Pictures from a Revolution, which  features the photographs Meiselas took during the Nicaraguan popular insurrection and follows her search a decade later to find and hear from the people in the photos.

Seventy-one of those photos were published in her hardcover book, “Nicaragua June ’78—July ’79,” which was published before she returned to the country and co-produced and directed the documentary with Alfred Guzzetti and Dick Rogers.

“It all begins with the photo and the relationships with the collaborators with whom the film is created. Filmmaking includes more collaborators, where photography is more of an isolated experience,” Meiselas told the nearly  100 students, faculty, staff and community members who attended the screening.

Her photos captured the fall of the Somoza regime and the revolution subsequently won by the Sandinistas in 1979. Since the images represent the various factions and lives of people who participated in the revolution in and out of battle, Meiselas wondered how they fared post-revolution. The film tells the story of those she could find, with Meiselas showing them their photo and asking about their lives since.

After the screening, Meiselas, Tom Lopez, professor of art and art history, and Bill Rothman, professor of cinema and interactive media, had a lively discussion about her process. “The film was constrained by trying to find only the people in the photos of the book,” said Meiselas.

This fall, Aperture re-issued the book to coincide with the 40th anniversary of her first trip to Nicaragua in 1978. The third release includes an augmented reality (AR) function, “Look and Listen” app which allows the reader to experience some of the images via two-to-four minute clips from Pictures from a Revolution as she returns to the same locations with the people she photographed. The AR app will be shared when she explores her work in professor Kim Grenfeder’s interactive class at the School of Communications in March.

What other activities Meiselas will be involved with is still evolving, but she plans to continue to engage students and faculty across departments in the hope that some of her experiences can complement their studies.

Miami has not been a subject for Meiselas; most of her previous encounters with the city have been  traveling through it to get to destinations throughout Latin America.

However, Meiselas said she is honored to be joining the University of Miami and is excited to dig deeper into the “multiplicity of lives” that she said Miami’s vibrant immigrant community cultivates.

Meiselas got her own start while teaching photography in an elementary school in the South Bronx during the 1970s. During that period, she became intrigued by a traveling “Girl Show” and the women who performed a striptease at small town carnivals and fairs in the Northeast. For three years during her summer breaks, Meiselas followed the women and the men they performed for from town to town. Her photographs evolved into her first book, Carnival Strippers, with images and stories she recorded at that time.

Her work has been published in The New York Times and Time Magazine, and she has had solo exhibitions in Paris, Madrid, Amsterdam, London, Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. She is a winner of the Robert Capa Gold Medal and in 1992 was named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow. Her work is included in American and international collections.

Alexandra Bassil contributed to this report.

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Nurse Scientist to Advance NINR’s Mission

Cianelli

Rosina Cianelli

UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 9, 2017)Rosina Cianelli, an associate professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies who teaches and conducts research in women’s health, health disparities, and international health, is among 15 new ambassadors selected by the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research (FNINR) to advance the  mission of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). Part of the National Institutes of Health, the NINR is dedicated to nursing research that promotes and improves the health of individuals, families, and communities.

Selected from a national pool of applicants, Cianelli and the other new ambassadors  join 15 current ambassadors who focus specifically on educating Congressional leaders about high-impact and cost-effective treatments and quality-of-life enhancements that emanate from nursing science. Ultimately, the goal is to advance research funding to ensure the training of nurse scientists at a time of major scientific breakthroughs, and to promote the NINR strategic plan for for improving the wellbeing of Americans across the human lifespan.

“We are exquisitely positioned to use science generated by highly trained nurses to generate cures, reduce symptoms and side effects, and promote health and wellbeing aimed at individuals, families, and communities,” said Karen Drenkard, president of the FNINR.

“In the last year,” she continued, “we have had important conversations with key Congressional leaders who are understanding and valuing how nurses function as scientists, individually and on integrated research teams. With the large number of newly elected officials nationally and at the state level, the ambassadors will join others, including our board, to bolster awareness and action for those discoveries that save lives, advance health, and reduce costs.”

An independent, non-profit organization, the FNINR seeks to support research-based nursing practice by educating health care professionals, Congress, and other appointed and elected officials, as well as the public in general, about the advances made through nursing research and its benefits to society.

 

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Victor Deupi Tapped as CINTAS President

UM News

Victor Deupi

Victor Deupi

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (January 3, 2017)—Victor Deupi, a Cuban-American teacher of architectural history and theory, design and representation at the School of Architecture, has been elected president of the CINTAS Foundation, which promotes the professional development of Cuban architects, writers, musicians, and visual artists.

“Mr. Deupi brings a new perspective with his distinct background while maintaining an emphatic commitment to each of the four disciplines supported by the foundation,” the organization said in announcing its fifth president.

Deupi, who received a B.S. in architecture from the University of Virginia, a M.S. in architecture from Yale University, and a Ph.D. in architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, previously taught at Fairfield University, the New York Institute of Technology, the University of Notre Dame, and the Prince of Wales’s Institute of Architecture in London. He also has been a “Visiting Critic” at the College of Architecture at Georgia Tech.

The principal focus of his research is on the art and architecture of the early modern Ibero-American world, and mid-20th-century Cuba. His book, Architectural Temperance: Spain and Rome, 1700-1759, was published by Routledge in 2015, and he is currently curating exhibitions on Cuban Architects at Home and in Exile: The Modernist Generation at the Coral Gables Museum, and Emilio Sanchez in South Florida Collections at the Lowe Art Museum.

He is also editing a book on Transformations in Classical Architecture: New Directions in Research and Practice that is being published by Oscar Riera Ojeda Publishers, 2017.

The CINTAS Foundation, established in 1963 with funds from the estate of Oscar B. Cintas (1887-1957), former Cuban ambassador to the United States, has awarded more than 300 fellowships and grants to Cuban artists achieving national and international renown. Several UM faculty members, including Jorge Hernandez, Jose Gelabert-Navia, Tomas Lopez-Gottardi, and Andres Duany, have been among the recipients.

In 2011, the foundation entered into an extended loan with Miami-Dade College’s MDC Museum of Art and Design of nearly 300 pieces by artists of Cuban descent living outside Cuba who have received prestigious CINTAS Fellowships. The museum is housed at the landmark Freedom Tower in downtown Miami.

 

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