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Appointments

Human Rights Clinic Founder Appointed White House Advisor on Violence Against Women

By Catharine Skipp
Special to UM News

Carrie Bettinger Lopez

Carrie Bettinger-Lopez

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (March 4, 2015)—Vice President Joe Biden announced today the appointment of Miami Law’s Caroline “Carrie” Bettinger-López as the new White House Advisor on Violence Against Women. Bettinger- López, a leading advocate for gender-based equality and human rights, has worked at local, national, and international levels to bring an end to violence against women.

In her new role, Bettinger-López will serve as an advisor to the president and vice president on domestic violence and sexual assault issues and as a liaison to the domestic violence and sexual assault advocacy communities, according to the White House.

She also will collaborate with federal agencies on the implementation of Violence Against Women Act programs and the coordination of federal efforts to address violence against women and girls both domestically and globally, and drive the development of new initiatives and policies to combat domestic violence and sexual assault with key public and private stakeholders.

“Throughout her career, Carrie has made clear that the most basic of human rights is freedom from violence,” Biden said. “I am honored that she will be joining my staff to continue the work we began with the Violence Against Women Act, and I know she will be a strong voice for women everywhere who continue to suffer from sexual assault and domestic violence in the worst prison on earth—the four walls of their own home.”

As a litigator and an advocate, Bettinger-López has fought for the protection of victims of domestic violence and the provision of remedies for violations of survivors’ rights. Prior to her legal career, Bettinger-López engaged in social services advocacy and youth education centered on women and girls’ empowerment, as well as anti-violence programming.

Most recently, Bettinger-López founded and served as director of the Human Rights Clinic at the  School of Law, where she served as an associate professor of clinical legal education. Her scholarship included a focus on violence against women, gender and race discrimination, and immigrant rights.

“We are delighted that Vice President Biden has asked Professor Bettinger-López to play this important role,” said School of Law Dean Patricia D. White. “Her path-breaking advocacy work makes her uniquely qualified to carry out her charge.”

Bettinger-López will lead the Obama administration’s efforts to put an end to violence against women. Among many important steps forward, the administration has led efforts to combat campus sexual assault, worked to prevent domestic violence homicides, and fought to extend protections to women of color and LGBT Americans who have been victims of violence, according to the White House.

 

 

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UM Trustee Appointed to National Panel on Airport Scanners

UM News

Edward Dauer

Dr. Edward A. Dauer

CORAL GABLES, FLA. (February 6, 2015)—University of Miami Trustee and triple alumnus Dr. Edward A. Dauer, a distinguished diagnostic radiologist in the community and research associate professor of biomedical engineering, radiology, and family medicine at UM, has been appointed to the National Academy of Sciences’ special advisory panel on the safety of ultrasound scanners used to screen passengers in airports across the nation.

As a member of the scientific committee on the millimeter wave machines, Dauer, the director of radiology at Florida Medical Center in Fort Lauderdale, will review how the Department of Homeland Security and equipment manufacturers estimate the level of non-ionizing millimeter wave radiation exposures that air travelers are exposed to when scanned by the advanced imaging technology. These screening machines are in use at approximately 160 airports across the nation. Unlike x-ray scanners, which use ionizing radiation that can break bonds in living cells, millimeter wave machines use low-energy, non-ionizing, radio frequency waves to detect weapons, explosives, or other hidden objects.

Appointed by Ralph J. Cicerone, president of the National Academy of Sciences and chair of the National Research Council, the committee is also charged with evaluating whether traveler and operator exposures to non-ionizing radiation meet health and safety standards, and whether the design, and the operating and maintenance procedures for ultrasound machines are appropriate for preventing over exposure.

“It is encouraging that an independent panel of scientists and researchers will be able to study and evaluate objective scientific data to assess the safety of this imaging technology and to protect the traveling public,” Dauer said.

James Tien, Distinguished Professor and Dean of the College of Engineering, said he immediately thought of recommending Dauer for the expert panel when he learned about the upcoming study of millimeter wave screeners. “As both an engineer and a medical doctor, he is uniquely qualified to be a member of the study committee,” Tien said. “Obviously, NAS President Dr. Ralph Cicerone was equally impressed with Dr. Dauer’s qualifications.”

Chaired by Kathryn V. Logan, the principal research engineer emerita at Georgia Institute of Technology and an adjunct professor at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, the 14-member panel’s report is due next year.

Dauer, the first undergraduate at UM to study biomedical engineering, earned his Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering in 1972, his medical degree in 1975, and his master’s in biomedical engineering in 2001. His current academic work at UM includes medical physiology, unified medical sciences, radiation physics, and radiation biology. He established the new research lab in scanning electron microscopy at the College of Engineering and is working on electron microscopy analysis of biomedical devices and tissue engineering. He also served on the Florida State Board of Medicine, the state’s licensing board for physicians, for 11 years, including two terms as chairman.

Dauer has served as a member of the UM Board of Trustees since 1996 and is currently a member of the Executive Committee. He was a member of UM’s President’s Council and of the Medical Dean Leadership Cabinet, and is an active member of the Miller School of Medicine Admissions Committee.

A member of Iron Arrow since 1996, he received the School of Medicine Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2000 and the Henry King Stanford Alumnus of the Year Award in 2001 for his ongoing dedication to the University.

Over the years, he and his family have been generous donors to the University, supporting the Richter Library, the Convocation Center, Athletics, the College of Engineering, the School of Medicine, the School of Nursing and Health Studies, and student scholarships.

 

 

 

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Beloved Scholar M. Minnette Massey Passes Torch to Charlton Copeland

By Catharine Skipp
Special to UM News

MasseyLawChair

M. Minnette Massey and Charlton Copeland

CORAL GABLES, FLA. (January 23, 2015)—She has been described as indomitable, outspoken, adorable, irascible, and deeply decent, with a splash of salt. He has been called spirited, astute, erudite, committed, and good humored.

On Thursday, January 29, M. Minnette Massey, professor of law emerita, will formally fulfill a promise she made in 2008 to Charlton Copeland, professor of law.

As Massey, former acting dean of Miami Law, half a century on the faculty, early adopter of diversity, and the undisputed queen of civil procedure, exited her final class, she turned to Copeland—still a new professor with only a year under his belt—and delivered the scepter. “It’s up to you now,” she bequeathed.

Copeland will be appointed the inaugural holder of the M. Minnette Massey Chair in Law on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. at the Lowe Art Museum.

Massey first arrived at the University of Miami in 1944 as a freshman, class of 1948. She would graduate from Miami Law in 1951 and join the faculty in 1958, while simultaneously earning an LL.M. as a Kenison Fellow at New York University.

The fair-haired, green-eyed spitfire was one of the “First Wave,” fourteen woman pioneers who elbowed their way into the male-dominated world of American law school professors. Massey began teaching legal research as an assistant law librarian, but rapidly asserted her dominance in the machinations of Florida civil procedure.

She would catch the attention of U.S. Supreme Court Justices Hugo Black and William O. Douglas, who admired her dazzling intellect and skills as a raconteur. Think Shirley MacLaine, only loads smarter. She ascended to assistant dean, then first woman dean, all the while imprinting armies of young lawyers as masters of the intricacies of litigation and the rightful leaders of their profession. She was a force to behold, and she used her powers to lead the law school into integration of both the faculty and student body.

When Copeland was born, Massey was already a decade past her midpoint at Miami Law. He would take a long, but far more interesting path to the steps of 1311 Miller Drive.

On his road to becoming a law teacher committed to the ideal of the training of lawyers and scholarly engagement, the young New Orleanian Copeland would weather many New England winters: first at Amherst College, then through both Divinity and Law School at Yale University. From there, he would clerk in South Africa for two justices of the Constitutional Court, then return to clerk at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. After clerking, he was an associate at Hogan & Hartson in Washington, D.C. Copeland began his academic career as a visiting professor at Northwestern University School of Law.

The Florida sun would finally shine on Copeland in 2007 when he was invited to join the faculty at Miami Law. From the lectern or the pulpit, the charismatic Copeland holds his audiences spellbound, although he suspects that such a feat is easier when students haven’t been introduced to the material through an episode on Law & Order.

Whether teaching civil procedure, administrative law, or federal courts, Copeland’s classes are highly sought after. His goals as a teacher are always to keep his students engaged in the subject matter by demonstrating the commonsense dimension of often-arid areas of study. Additionally, he aims to demonstrate the relevance of these subjects to both the practical questions that lawyers face and the fundamental issues of policymaking in a democracy. Copeland considers himself first and foremost a teacher of lawyers who, he expects, will do great things in their respective communities.

Copeland’s passion for teaching is fueled by his scholarly interests. His primary area of research during his time at Miami Law has been an attempt to rethink our conceptualization of the national-state relationship as reflected in state and national institutions. In both his writings on federalism and his more explicit writing on the theological dimensions of law and politics, Copeland has been influenced by his belief that there is something normatively consequential in our being stuck in a polity with others with whom we disagree, and that our political and legal institutions and discourses reflect the tensions created by this reality. He has not shied away from tackling issues of contemporary moment, including the federalism debate surrounding the Affordable Care Act and the debates over marriage equality.

Copeland once met a Miami Law alumnus, who credited Massey with having gotten him a life-changing internship in Washington, D.C. at the National Labor Relations Board. So impressed by the impact Massey had on students, Copeland is proud to be the inaugural faculty member in Miami Law’s Washington, D.C., Semester-in-Practice, which combines an externship in Washington, D.C., with coursework in Copeland’s Federal Policy Making.

From Massey, Copeland inherited the role of faculty advisor for the Florida Supreme Court internship program. He fondly remembers that in a conversation with Massey a few years into his advising, she complained that he had seemingly picked the students with the best academic record, forgetting the impact that the program could have on the lives of students whose promise could be seen despite less than stellar grades. She reminded him that teachers are empowered to imagine futures for students that they don’t yet see, and sometimes teachers are best-equipped to help them achieve such futures.

It is fitting that the first M. Minnette Massey Chair in Law is Massey 2.0, also known as Charlton Copeland.

The M. Minnette Massey Chair in Law was established through the generosity of a consortium of Miami Law alumni and friends, and by a lead gift from Lawrence B. Rodgers, J.D. ’67. In honor of her pioneering role, The Massey Chair will be permanently attached to the dean’s position at Miami Law. All future deans will be known as Dean and M. Minnette Massey Chair in Law. In the interim, the chair will rotate among Miami Law faculty and be awarded for two-year terms.

RSVP for the installation ceremony.

 

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Brian Blake Named Editor of Influential Internet Computing Journal

UM News

M.Brian.BlakeCORAL GABLES, Fla. (December 19, 2015)— Brian Blake, vice provost for academic affairs and dean of the Graduate School, has been named editor in chief of IEEE Internet Computing, effective January 1. Blake currently serves as associate editor in chief of the magazine, a top-ranked publication that provides peer-reviewed, journal-quality evaluations and reviews of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

A computer scientist and software engineer, Blake, joined the University from Notre Dame in 2012.  

Published bi-monthly by the IEEE Computer Society, Internet Computing consistently ranks among the top 10, and often in the top 5, for influence and impact of all the computer science/software engineering journals listed in the Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports. At the crossroads between academic researchers and software professionals, the magazine presents novel content from academic and industry experts on a wide range of topics, including applications, architectures, information management, middleware, policies, security, and standards.

The IEEE Computer Society is the world’s leading computing membership organization and information and career-development source for a global workforce of technology leaders, including: professors, researchers, software engineers, IT professionals, employers, and students.

 

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Nick Shay Named Editor in Chief of International Research Journal

Nick Shay

Nick Shay

UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (August 15, 2014)—Lynn K. “Nick” Shay, a longtime editorial board member of Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans, has been named editor in chief of the international journal for research related to the dynamical and physical processes governing atmospheres, oceans, and climate. A professor in the Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography at UM’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Shay assumed the post in July.

A fellow of the American Meteorological Society, Shay was part of a NASA Group Achievement Award for his work with satellite altimetry during the Genesis and Rapid Intensity (GRIP) Program conducted in the fall of 2010.

His research interests include experimental and theoretical investigations of the ocean response and coupled air-sea interactions during hurricanes, airborne oceanographic profiling of upper ocean variability, coastal oceanographic process studies, and high frequency (HF) and satellite radar remote sensing to examine the linkages between surface signatures and upper ocean structure. The author of more than 90 peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters, he has chaired or served on 30 student committees.

Shay also has served on the editorial boards of a number of other journals, including the AMS Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanographic Technology and on various panels and committees, including the  board of directors of the Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association; National Federation of Regional Association National HF Radar Steering Team; NSF and NOAA Hurricanes at Landfall; NOAA Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Observing and Coupled Modeling Teams; Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System-Regional Association Observations Committee; and the NASA Hurricane Science Team.

Internationally, he has been the Oceanic Impacts and Air-Sea Interaction rapporteur for the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) International Workshop for Tropical Cyclones and a panel member of the WMO Landfall Processes and HFR Oceanography Workshops.

 

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