e-Veritas
Briefly Noted

Renowned Violinist Charles Castleman Joins the Music Faculty

UM News

The appointment of Charles Castleman, one of music world’s greatest and most beloved mentors, is " a watershed moment for the Frost School of Music."

The appointment of Charles Castleman, one of the music world’s greatest and most beloved mentors, is ” a watershed moment for the Frost School of Music.”

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (July 9, 2014)—Charles Castleman, a prize-winning concert artist, celebrated master teacher, and renowned string quartet coach, is joining the Frost School of Music faculty as professor of violin after nearly 40 years at the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester in New York, where he chaired the strings department for eight years.

Castleman is one of the world’s most active performers and pedagogues on the violin today. A dynamic and highly expressive musical artist, he has appeared as a featured soloist with the orchestras of Philadelphia, Boston, Brisbane, Chicago, Hong Kong, Moscow, Mexico City, New York, San Francisco, Seoul, and Shanghai, to name a few. A beloved artist-teacher with thousands of devotees and former students around the world, he has conducted master classes in all major cities of Europe, the U.S., Australia, Canada, and New Zealand.

He is also the founder and director of the prestigious Castleman Quartet Program, an intensive and extensive summer workshop in solo and chamber performance that is celebrating its 45th continuous year. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma praised it as “the best program of its kind… a training ground in lifemanship.”

Castleman will begin transitioning his teaching from Eastman to Frost during the 2014-2015 academic year. He will be traveling regularly to the Coral Gables campus beginning this September to teach select private lessons, conduct master classes, and coach chamber music ensembles. He will begin teaching exclusively at Frost at the start of the fall 2015 semester. Full-time undergraduate and graduate violin students who are selected to matriculate into the University and the Frost School at the start of the fall 2015 semester will then be eligible to study full time with Castleman. The application deadlines are this December 1, and admission requirements and audition information are available at www.miami.edu/frost.

A remarkably gifted performing artist whose first public performance was at age 6 with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, Castleman made his solo recital debuts at age 9 at Jordan Hall in Boston and Town Hall in New York. He was a medalist in his early 20s at the prestigious and highly competitive International “Tchaikovsky” and “Brussels” competitions (the International Tchaikovsky Competition is held every four years in Moscow, Russia; the Queen Elisabeth Competition, also known as the Brussels Concours Musical International, is held in Brussels, Belgium).

The recording of Castleman’s competition performance of Léon Jongen’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra with the Belgian National Orchestra was recently selected as one of only 17 violin performances to represent the excellence of the Brussels Concours Musical’s 50-year history and is included in a multi-box CD set on the Cypres Records label. Castleman’s former students have also been winners at international competitions including Brussels, Munich, Naumburg, and Szeryng and perform in top professional chamber groups and major orchestras.

“The appointment of Charles Castleman is a watershed moment for the Frost School of Music,” said Frost Dean Shelton G. Berg. “He is one of the world’s greatest and most beloved mentors in music. Charles is an innovator and forward thinker, and he will contribute greatly to the paradigm-shifting curriculum and ideals of our school. We know that the world of music continues to expand, and we will nurture and inform the skill set that prepares our graduates for vibrant careers.”

Castleman credits the Frost School’s forward-thinking faculty and leadership for his decision to join the faculty, beginning August 15. “The leadership, history, and location of the Frost School uniquely positions it to find, educate, and nourish young musicians of the highest achievement, endowed with the most extraordinary talent, from all the Americas. I am pleased and proud to be able to contribute to its future effectiveness and to add my input to its remarkably innovative thrust.”

In addition to teaching private violin lessons exclusively at the Frost School and coaching Frost string quartets starting in fall 2015, Castleman will interact with all string musicians in the Frost Chamber Orchestra, Frost Symphony Orchestra, and the Frost School’s Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra through master classes and workshops. He also will incorporate his creative and collaborative teaching concepts into the Frost School’s trailblazing Experiential Music Curriculum, help shape a brand new type of master’s degree in performance, and participate in leading-edge initiatives at Frost, such as Universal Music U @ Frost to explore new concert and recording paradigms for classical music artists.

A prolific recording artist himself, Castleman’s impressive discography includes some of the most difficult works ever written for violin. His solo albums include recordings of six Solo Sonatas by Ysaÿe, eight Csardases for Violin and Orchestra by Jenő Hubay, and ten virtuoso cameos by Pablo de Sarasate. He also has recorded selections by George Gershwin and contemporary chamber music for violin with harpsichord by Darius Milhaud, Walter Piston, Samuel Adler, and much more.

As one of 16 Ford Foundation Concert Artists, Castleman commissioned David Amram’s Violin Concerto and premiered it with Leonard Slatkin and the St. Louis Symphony; he later recorded it with the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra for the Newport Classic label. He is a dedicatee of the Paracelsus-inspired violin-harpsichord work “Lares Hercii” by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Christopher Rouse. 

Castleman’s long-term chamber music associations have included performing and recording with The New String Trio of New York, plus recording numerous albums on major labels with the Raphael Trio and much-admired premieres at the Vienna Festival and the Kennedy Center.

Castleman earned degrees from Harvard University, Curtis Institute of Music, and the University of Pennsylvania. His teachers were Emanuel Ondricek (teaching assistant of Otakar Ševčík, a student of Eugène Ysaÿe) and Ivan Galamian (venerated violinist and pedagogue). Castleman credits David Oistrakh, Henryk Szeryng, and Josef Gingold as his most influential coaches. He plays the “Marquis de Champeaux” Stradivarius and “Sammons” Goffriller from 1708, and chooses from over 80 bows.

From the four pinnacles of performing, teaching, recording, and collaborating, classical music professionals hold Castleman in the highest regard. His joining the award-winning and esteemed full-time faculty of the Frost School of Music, of which close to 50 percent has been hired since Dean Berg joined the school in 2007 will quickly help expand the Frost School’s range and reputation throughout the world.

Posted in Appointments, NewsComments Off

Medical Student and Former Navy Pilot Named UM’s First Tillman Military Scholar

Special to UM News

MIAMI, Fla. (June 24, 2014) —William Burns, a former U.S. Navy fighter pilot who is entering his fourth year as a medical student, has been named the University of Miami’s first Tillman Military Scholar. The $15,000 award is given by the Pat Tillman Foundation to active-duty service members, veterans and military spouses who are pursuing higher education, and who wish to continue to be of service to others.

“Many would think twice about going back to school later in life for a second career,” said Burns, 40, a lieutenant commander who has been in the Navy for nearly 20 years. “Instead, I see it as an opportunity to continue my service to others through healing. I believe my operational experience will give me a unique perspective in the Navy Medical Corps, and I am excited about the future.”

Burns is the first UM applicant ever selected for the honor, and the only applicant out of seven from UM selected this year. The Pat Tillman Foundation — named for the Arizona Cardinals star who left a successful professional football career in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks to enlist in the U.S. Army, and who was killed in Afghanistan two years later — selected a total of 60 scholarship recipients from 7,500 applications received nationwide.

“This is a tremendous honor for Will and the school,” said Alex J. Mechaber, M.D., Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education and associate professor of medicine. “I cannot think of a student better suited for this award. Will is a class act who represents the fine qualities that the late Pat Tillman displayed.”

The Pat Tillman Foundation agreed.

“William stood out for his desire to not only continue his service at home, but also to leverage his military leadership skills in a new field — medicine,” said Cara Campbell, the foundation’s program manager. “Nearly a quarter of Tillman Military Scholars have similarly gone on to pursue their education in medicine. We’re proud to support him in that endeavor.”

Burns will meet his fellow Tillman Military Scholars at the fifth annual Pat Tillman Leadership Summit, which is being held June 26-29 at Roosevelt University in Chicago.

He became a pilot after graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1995, in part because he originally hoped to be an astronaut. Although that never happened, his career has been filled with plenty of Earth-bound excitement. Over the next 16 years, he was deployed to the Mediterranean, to Kosovo, and twice to Iraq and three times to Afghanistan to provide close air support in his F/A-18C Hornet to ground troops in the thick of the action.

Ultimately, however, it was the quieter times during stateside duty that led Burns to medicine.

“I had thought about becoming a physician while I was at Annapolis, but aviation won out,” he said. “I’m not big at sitting behind a desk, so I looked for something else to do in between deployments. When I was stationed with theVFA-25 squadron in California in 2008, I became a volunteer EMT. Later, while working at the Pentagon, I became a volunteer firefighter/EMT for Fairfax County, Virginia. In 2010, I began applying to medical schools.”

In some ways, Burns’ gradual shift into medicine was predestined. Growing up in Tulsa, Okla., he had medical-military role models right at home. His mother was a nurse anesthetist, and his stepfather was a family physician — both had served in the U.S. Army Reserve — and his father had been a U.S. Army Special Forces medic in Vietnam.

Burns is a lifelong Hurricanes fan with a strong interest in international medicine, so the Miller School was also a natural choice. Since he arrived, he has distinguished himself through his leadership — he has been president of his class three years running — and through his commitment to service — he becomes the new executive director of the Mitchell Wolfson Sr. Department of Community Service program, known as DOCS, in the fall.

He has also volunteered his time and expertise through Medical Students in Action (in the Dominican Republic) and Project Medishare through Caneshare (in Haiti), as a Step 1 Review Course teacher and anatomy teaching assistant, and as a volunteer counselor during Heart Week at Camp Boggy Creek, which serves seriously ill children and their families.

Burns will owe the Navy four years of active duty service after he graduates, and unlike most of his classmates, he will be matching with a residency at a military medical center. If he pursues emergency medicine, his options will be Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, in Virginia, or Naval Medical Center San Diego, in California. If he pursues his other interest, trauma surgery, a third option will be Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md.

“I am committed to service,” said Burns, “but I also am always seeking new challenges. I look forward to a career in medicine because it will fulfill both of those goals.”

Posted in Honors, NewsComments Off

Richard K. Parrish II Receives Florida Society of Ophthalmology’s Leadership Award

Richard K. Parrish II

Richard K. Parrish II

MIAMI, Fla. (June 25, 2014) — The Miller School of Medicine’s Richard K. Parrish II has received the John R. Brayton, Jr., M.D., Leadership Award from the Florida Society of Ophthalmology (FSO), the state’s preeminent professional association for physicians who specialize in vision care.

The award, presented at the FSO’s annual meeting in Orlando, Fla., recognizes a Florida-based ophthalmologist who exemplifies leadership and dedication to the profession.

Parrish joined the medical school faculty as assistant professor in 1982, was promoted to professor in 1994, and served as residency program director from 1995 through 1999. From 1996 through 1999, he was chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology. He currently serves as associate dean for graduate medical education for the Miller School, chairman of the Graduate Medical Education Committee, and  the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s (ACGME) Designated Institutional Official for Jackson Memorial Hospital. He has a principal interest in glaucoma surgical care and was project chairman of the National Eye Institute Fluorouracil Filtering Surgery Trial. He is a vice-chairman of the Ocular Hypertension Treatment Study (OHTS) and principal investigator of the OHTS Optic Disc Reading Center.

Parrish earned his undergraduate degree from Indiana University and his medical degree from the Indiana University School of Medicine. He completed his internship at the University of Alabama and his residency in ophthalmology at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia, where he also served as chief resident. He completed a clinical fellowship in glaucoma and a research fellowship in glaucoma at Bascom Palmer.

Parrish has been involved with the American Ophthalmological Society since 1996 and was a member of FSO’s Board of Directors from 1996 to 1999. He also currently serves on the editorial board of the American Journal of Ophthalmology and as the executive editor of the Glaucoma Section of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

Posted in Honors, NewsComments Off

Pioneering Physical Therapist Honored for Advancing Her Field

Meryl Cohen

Meryl Cohen

Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (June 25, 2014)—Among the nation’s first cardiovascular and pulmonary (CVP) physical therapists, Meryl I. Cohen, assistant professor of clinical physical therapy and a member of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, has received the American Physical Therapy Association’s (APTA) Catherine Worthingham Fellow Award for her pioneering and innovative contributions to the field.

In accepting the association’s highest honor, Cohen shared the credit with her “village”— her patients, students, family members, friends, colleagues, and bosses, who she said enabled her success. “I am thrilled and very humbled to receive this award,” she said. “Thank you to my village.”

In the 1970s, Cohen was among the first physical therapists to recognize that progressive mobilization, when adequately monitored and followed by CVP conditioning, would offer high-risk individuals the opportunity to successfully return to their communities. She later developed several cardiac rehabilitation programs, including in the District of Columbia, Virginia, and South Florida.

In 1985 she was among the first three professionals the APTA recognized as board certified cardiopulmonary clinical specialists. As a professor, she has won six Teacher of the Year awards, and has served as a mentor and advocate to those rising in the CVP area of the physical therapy profession.

Cohen also has been recognized by the APTA and its components almost every year for her expertise in CVP physical therapy. Her honors include Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Practice by the Massachusetts Chapter of APTA, the Linda D. Crane Lectureship, and two research awards.

The Catherine Worthingham Fellow designation honors individuals whose sustained leadership, influence, and achievements have advanced the physical therapy profession. The APTA represents more than 88,000 physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy nationwide.

Posted in Honors, NewsComments Off

Daniel Berg Honored for His ‘Genius’ at Resolving Management Problems

Special to UM News

Daniel Berg, left, receives the Siwei Cheng Award in Information Technology and Quantitative Management at the IAITQM meeting in Moscow.

Daniel Berg, left, receives the Siwei Cheng Award in Information Technology and Quantitative Management at the IAITQM meeting in Moscow.

CORAL GABLES,  Fla. (June 24, 2014)—Daniel Berg, distinguished research professor of engineering, received the prestigious Siwei Cheng Award in Information Technology and Quantitative Management at the second annual meeting of the International Academy of Informational Technology and Quantitative Management (IAITQM) in Moscow this month.

Berg received the honor during the June 3-5 gathering for being “a person who has devoted genius efforts to applying quantitative methods and information technology to solve management problems.” The award is named for a former top leader in the Chinese Congress who heads a major program on economic theory at the renowned Chinese Academy of Science.

IAITQM was established in 2011 to promote innovative excellence in information technology and quantitative management; the organization has founding members from more than 50 countries, including the United States, China, Japan, Australia, and Turkey.

Berg was both surprised and honored by the award, noting that IAITQM members represent the most talented and experienced experts in his growing field. He also noted that the award’s namesake will be visiting the UM College of Engineering this year and looks forward to his interaction with the faculty and students on several topics.

Berg previously was dean and provost at Carnegie Mellon University, as well as provost and president at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Institute Professor of Science and Technology. He received his B.S. in chemistry and physics from the City College of New York and his M.S. and Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Yale. He was employed by Westinghouse Electric in a variety of technical/managerial positions, including technical director.

Berg serves as the American editor of the International Journal of Services Technology and Management. He is the author of four books, five book chapters, and more than 80 refereed journal articles. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), a Fellow of The Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS); and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

His many additional awards and honors include the IEEE Engineering Management Section Educator of the Year Award; the International Association for Management of Technology’s Award for Distinguished Achievement in Management of Technology; the IEEE Educational Activities Board Meritorious Achievement Award in Continuing Education; the National Academy of Engineering Service Award; the Townsend Harris Medal, City College of New York; the Wilbur Cross Medal, Yale University; and the Belden Prize for Mathematics.

Posted in Honors, NewsComments Off

  • Features
  • Tags
  • Popular
  • Subscribe
  • Subscribe to the Veritas RSS Feed
    Get updates to all of the latest Veritas posts by clicking the logo at the right.

    You can also subscribe to specific categories by browsing to a particular section on our site and clicking the RSS icon below each section's header.

UM Facebook

UM Twitter