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CANCELLED: Sea Secrets Lecture Series with Susan Avery February 9

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and The Ocean Research and Education Foundation cancelled the Thursday, February 9 Sea Secrets lecture by Susan Avery, president and director emerita of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The sponsors hope to reschedule Avery for a future Sea Secrets lecture and encourage you register for and attend the other  forthcoming talks in the series on:

Thursday, March 9:

schmidt

“Choosing our Climate Adventure” at the Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 6 p.m.

Gavin Schmidt, director of NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

During his talk, “Choosing our Climate Adventure,” Gavin Schmidt will discuss his work on how models of past, present, and future climate can be used to determine the fingerprints of climate drivers and what that means for past and present changes. Additionally, he will discuss the implications for future policy choices, including mitigation and adaptation and the outlines of the adventure our society will have to choose.

RSVP: https://seasecrets3.eventbrite.com/

 

Thursday, April 6:

ausubel

Naked DNA in My Seawater” at the Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 6 p.m.

Jesse Ausubel, director and senior research associate for the Program for the Human Environment, The Rockefeller University   

 During his talk, “Naked DNA in My Seawater,” Jesse Ausubel will introduce us to the eDNA in our seawater that you may have gulped while swimming. Loose or extracellular DNA abounds in natural water, salt and fresh. It may shed like dandruff from the break-up of cells. The presence of many aquatic animals can be reliably detected by analyzing water samples for the presence of DNA fragments. Emerging eDNA technology could add to or supplant traditional time-consuming, expensive, and destructive monitoring methods. As reference libraries of DNA grow, eDNA could become an effective way to understand the status of marine life.

Winners of the annual Rosenstiel School Underwater Photography Contest will be announced following this lecture.

RSVP: https://seasecrets4.eventbrite.com/

 

Thursday, May 4: 

bretos-baker

Coral Reefs and Science Diplomacy: Bridging the Gap with Cuba” at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Science Museum, 1101 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL, 33132, beginning with a reception at 7 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:30 p.m.

Fernando Bretos, director of MUVE at Frost Science

Andrew Baker, associate professor, Department of Marine Biology and Ecology, UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

During their presentation, “Coral Reefs and Science Diplomacy: Bridging the Gap with Cuba,” Fernando Bretos and Andrew Baker will discuss the efforts they are spearheading to use science diplomacy to bring marine science together in the two countries after 55 years of isolation. The recent re-establishment of diplomatic relations is opening new avenues for scientific investigation and environmental conservation. Frost Science Curator Fernando Bretos and UM Professor Baker will discuss new joint research they are conducting with Cuban scientists on the connections between coral reefs in the U.S. and our neighbor 90 miles south. Join us as we learn about their work to understand why Cuba’s reefs are in better condition than those in the U.S., how they can be protected from further declines, and how they might help boost the resilience of Florida’s coral reefs.

RSVP: https://seasecrets5.eventbrite.com/

For more information, email events@rsmas.miami.edu or call 305-421-4061.

The 2017 Sea Secrets lecture series is sponsored by The Shepard Broad Foundation, Sheryl Gold, William J. Gallwey III, Esquire, Key Biscayne Community Foundation, Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation, Concrete Beach Brewery, Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits, and WPBT PBS.

Winners of the annual Rosenstiel School Underwater Photography Contest will be announced following the April 6 lecture.

 

 

 

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Building Tradition: Making the Presidential Chair

By Maya Bell
UM News

UMPresidentialChairCORAL GABLES, Fla. (April 22, 2016) — As a master furniture maker, Austin Matheson has crafted dozens of handmade chairs, most of them for dining room sets destined to become family heirlooms. He’s sawed, chiseled, and sculpted them from prized wood in numerous styles—from Shaker to Colonial West Indian to Arts and Crafts—but they all have one thing is common: “As soon as they leave my shop I never lay eyes on them again,’’ Matheson says.

That will not be the case with the one-of-kind University of Miami Presidential Chair that Matheson, an adjunct professor of architecture, created at the request of President Julio Frenk. Known as a cathedra, the chair is a traditional symbol of the seat of learning and will take its place on the commencement stage as a new symbol of the Office of the President.

Matheson, a fifth-generation Floridian whose own rich family history in South Florida predates the University’s 1925 founding, carved and joined what appear to be the seamless pieces of the simple but elegant chair emblazoned with the University seal and the more subtle detail of the ibis from a single slab of highly prized Cuban mahogany wood.

The cathedra, which took Matheson 120 hours of painstaking labor to complete at his Fine Handmade Furniture shop in Miami, will be on exhibit on Thursday, April 28, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. at the School of Architecture’s Korach Gallery, with a reception at 5 p.m. The exhibit, Building Tradition: The Making of the University of Miami Presidential Chair, will also feature the drawings, models, and patterns chronicling the process of creating the chair from tree to finished object.

Austin matheson works on the prototype of what would beciem theThe Univerisyt of Miami Presidential Chair in his mimi a woofurniute-makign shop.

Adjunct Professor Austin Matheson works on the prototype of what would become The University of Miami Presidential Chair at his handmade furniture  shop in Miami.

Originally weighing 200 pounds and measuring 7 feet long, 33 inches wide, and 4.5 inches thick, the slab of once-abundant Cuban mahogany was salvaged from a tree in nearby Coconut Grove that, fittingly for a University that opened amid the ruins of the 1926 hurricane, was felled decades later by another hurricane.

The fluidity of Matheson’s seemingly seamless design represents the idea that “We Are One U,” while his inventive incorporation of both a contemporary style and traditional flourishes represent the University’s rich past and promising future. “The chair is unique, it has no precedent. It stands alone,” Matheson said.

In what Matheson called “a tricky maneuver,” the Great Seal of the University of Miami was carefully etched by a computerized laser into a place of prominence, on the splat, or back of the chair. Matheson’s teaching assistant, Zach Anderson, performed that honor. “He practiced it about six or seven times,” Matheson recalls.

More subtle are the twin silhouettes of the ibis head, with its graceful beak, that adorn each side of the crest rail. Known for its invincible spirit when hurricanes approach, the marsh bird has been the school mascot since the University opened its doors, just a month after the hurricane of 1926 devastated Miami. And just like the ibis, Matheson and President Frenk hope the University of Miami Presidential Chair will continue to serve as a symbol of the University’s resilience and renewal through its new century, and long after.

“The University of Miami Presidential Chair brings together the intellectual and artistic resources of our faculty, the natural resources of our city, and the rich traditions of our University,” President Frenk said.

“It was a great project and I have to say I like it a lot,’’ added Matheson, who teaches furniture design and fabrication, one of the few non-theoretical, hands-on courses at the School of Architecture. “It was a long process, but since I was only making one, it was an honor to devote that kind of time to it. After all, it is something that will last a long, long time.”

 

 

 

 

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School of Communication to Host Coral Gables Comedy Festival

ComicCure2CORAL GABLES, Fla. (March 16, 2016) — Comic Cure brings the Coral Cables Comedy Festival to the University of Miami campus on Thursday, March 31, when more than 20 local comedians will take the stage at the Bill Cosford Cinema to compete for the title of “fan favorite.” A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Public Relations Experience Program (PREP) in the School of Communication.

“As a UM alumnus, it’s not only rewarding to bring my work back to the very campus that taught me so much, but I feel it’s my responsibility to provide a learning opportunity for students,” explained co-founder Benjamin Leis. “UM and the School of Communication have such amazing programs, organizations, and offerings. We hope to highlight a few that evening.”

Leis has had a special connection with the University of Miami since he stepped foot on campus as a freshman from Philadelphia in August of 2004. He was an active campus leader having pursued a degree in broadcast journalism and political science. After graduation his involvement with the University continued, as a volunteer leader for seven years and as a professional working for the UM Alumni Association for about five years.

In Comic Cure’s special festival format, more than 20 comedians divided between the two shows perform their best material in three-minute sets. At the end of each show, the audience votes for their favorite, choosing which comedian wins the grand prize and bragging rights.

Tickets are available in advance for $20 at CoralGablesComedyFestival.com. Tickets are also available for $30 the night of the show at the Cosford Cinema, 5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables, Fla. 33143, as long as seats are available. People 18 and older are welcome with discounted tickets for students. Parking is available for free on campus. Doors open at 6 p.m. with shows at 7 and 9 p.m.

PREP is a faculty-supervised course for students to take their knowledge out of the classroom and into the workplace. PREP is designed to provide students with hands-on experience “doing” their future careers. PREP provides a supervised workforce for special events, non-profits, and sports organizations throughout South Florida.

Comic Cure produces live comedic events showcasing local performers to raise awareness, volunteers, and funds for local charities. Created by Leis and his brother, Richy, in 2015, Comic Cure combines the passions of both brothers while supporting deserving non-profits within the community.

 

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Confront Female Insecurities at FACE IT Photography Exhibit on March 21

Girls 4 Good and SPARK will present FACE IT, a biannual photography exhibit highlighting the insecurities and stereotypes experienced by female  members of the UM community, on Monday, March 21, from 5 to 8 p.m. in the University Center Storm Surge Room.

FACE IT is a way for members of the UM community to confront insecurities by writing them directly on their bodies. These portraits will be juxtaposed with a second photo of each participant, in which words/phrases are submitted by the participants’ friends, family, or significant others and highlight positive qualities in the participants.

The organizers hope that, in showcasing the discrepancy between how women perceive themselves and how their loved ones perceive them, they will bring awareness to both women’s mental health and the restrictions imposed by societal perceptions of femininity. Educational materials regarding these topics will be provided during the exhibit.

FACE IT is also an interactive exhibit, meaning that every attendee will get to participate in the event.

 

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View the Work of Incoming MFA Students at CAS Gallery Reception September 4

Karla Kantorovich, Flaw 3, Mixed Media on Canvas,

Flaw3, by Karla Kantorovich, mixed media on canvas

The works of incoming Master of Fine Arts graduate students Patricia Cooke (sculpture), Karli Evans (photography), Karla Kantorovich (painting), Izia Lindsay (graphic design), Anna Meier (sculpture), and Jeannette Stargala (printmaking) are on view until Friday, September 18 at the CAS Gallery, located at the Wesley Foundation, 1210 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables, where a reception for the artists will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, September 4. Admission is free and open to the public.

CAS Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m., Tuesday to Friday.

The MFA program is a 60-credit, three-year program resulting in a terminal degree that both prepares students to enter the professional, studio art world and qualifies them for college teaching. The program is highly competitive, with applicants coming from across the country and around the world. For more information about the exhibition or the CAS Gallery, call 305-284-3161 or email m.cardoso1@miami.edu.

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