Tag Archive | "college of engineering"

Center for Green Aviation to Focus on Electric Planes

Tags:

Center for Green Aviation to Focus on Electric Planes


Special to UM News

electric-aircraftCORAL GABLES, Fla. (December 13, 2016)—Funded in part with a grant from the Emil Buehler Perpetual Trust, the College of Engineering  has established a Center for Green Aviation to further develop green, zero-direct-emission electric aircraft, with a particular focus on increasing their range and payload capacity. The first such research facility in the United States, the facility will provide the next generation of electric aircraft engineers hands-on experience in cutting-edge technologies.

The center will capitalize on the expertise and unique technology of the college’s Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department,  which the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA),  the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration, (DARPA) and Boeing have recognized with grants and contracts.

“The Center for Green Aviation will develop technologies that make this green transportation option practical for future aviation,” says Ge-Cheng Zha,  co-director of the center and a professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department. “We will begin with small General Aviation aircraft and thin-haul aircraft. Today’s electric aircraft can only go short distances of 100 miles or so. Our research will change the face of consumer aircraft, as well as unmanned aerial drone systems.”

Researchers at the college have already demonstrated a novel design, which was able to fly more than twice the distance of a similarly sized electric aircraft that used conventional design. Their new design allowed for a 510-mile range with four passengers. This design is based on a flow control technology, called Co-Flow jet airfoil, which was developed at the University of Miami. The technology offers radically increased aerodynamic efficiency and lift coefficient.

Integrating that design with the college’s discoveries and expertise in aerodynamics science, electric power sources using structure batteries, and multi-functional composite materials, the Center for Green Aviation will develop technologies including the ultra-high-lift, high-efficiency co-flow jet (CFJ) wing; ultra-high-capacity electric energy storage devices (UHEES); integrated multifunctional structural batteries; and high-efficiency, low-noise swept propellers. The center will be integrated with the college’s educational programs for graduate and undergraduate students.

“A few years ago, everyone thought electric cars were just a dream. Now, you see Tesla and many other manufacturers that have turned that dream into a reality. The same is going to happen with green aviation,” says Jean-Pierre Bardet, dean of the College of Engineering and director of the center. “Now, we need partnerships between academic researchers and industry in order to update and fine-tune the technology and bring electric aircraft to market. By bringing together science, technology, engineering, and practice, we will be able to develop products with tangible benefits for society. Having the University of Miami at the forefront of such a development is important, not only for the University, but for the world of aviation.”

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page TeaserComments Off

Tags:

3D Collaborative Lab Will Help Turn Ideas Into Reality


Special to UM News

3dlabrendering

A birds-eye rendering shows how the 5,850-square-foot lab will be organized.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (December 7, 2016)—Promising to revolutionize the design and invention process at the University of Miami and bring the institution a step closer to becoming the innovation hub of South Florida, a new collaborative fabrication laboratory equipped by Johnson & Johnson Services Inc. with the latest in 3D printers will open soon at UM’s College of Engineering, giving faculty, students, and researchers from across the institution the tools and technology they need to turn their ideas into reality.

The 3D Printing Collaborative Laboratory, a joint initiative with Johnson & Johnson, will feature state-of-the-art additive manufacturing equipment, better known as 3D printers, and other high-tech devices that will speed the development of interdisciplinary research projects and grant proposals, help students complete capstone projects, and provide experiential learning opportunities for undergraduates and graduates. A full-time engineer/scientist will be onsite at the 5,850-square-foot lab for training purposes.

“The Collaborative Laboratory will change the way people create, interact, and work on projects, and further collaborative work across the different disciplines to create a culture of solving global issues,” said Jean-Pierre Bardet, dean of the College of Engineering. “Our collaboration with Johnson & Johnson Services Inc. gives us the opportunity for technical advancement and promotion of excellence in education.”

Representatives from Johnson & Johnson Services will collaborate with UM students and faculty to support research in materials development and advanced process development for medical applications. The 3D printing process, which involves making three-dimensional solid objects from digital files, could revolutionize the field of orthopaedics, eye health, and consumer products.

Housed at the McArthur Engineering Building, the lab will be a centerpiece of the college’s strategic initiatives in research and education and will embrace UM President Julio Frenk’s Roadmap to Our New Century initiative, offering a space for collaboration and problem-solving based on interdisciplinary inquiry. It also will advance UM’s goal of becoming a hemispheric innovation hub through industry and community partnerships that promote ideas and product development, and will strengthen the University’s initiatives in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page More NewsComments Off

Tags:

Students Design Projects for the ‘Living Laboratory’ of Miami Beach


Special to UM News

Among the project students will design for Miami Beach is a new use for this fire station property.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (November 14, 2016) — With the city of Miami Beach as their client, students in the College of Engineering’s Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering are developing sustainable designs for three properties: Maurice Gibb Memorial Park, the current site of Fire Station No. 1, and the Byron Carlyle Theater.

For their senior design projects, the students’ designs must, at a minimum, meet LEED Gold standards, with an emphasis on resiliency and sustainability. They also must address sea-level rise adaptation and climate-change mitigation, meet the local community’s needs and, of course, adhere to Miami Beach’s city code. The course supports the recent city/university partnership in the MetroLab Network for the Smart Cities initiative, which promotes innovative research for sea-level rise adaptation.

The students began working on their designs early this semester after site visits with the city. “We met with the city of Miami Beach to obtain guidance, but we also have interviewed local residents and businesses to determine their needs for the area,” said Michael Notarfrancesco, a senior in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering. “It is very rewarding and relevant working on real-world problems and especially with a local municipality to provide implementable solutions.”

The design projects will conclude when the students present their proposals to Miami Beach officials, industry advisory boards, and consultants in early 2017.

“The city of Miami Beach continues to serve as a living laboratory,” said Elizabeth Wheaton, director of Miami Beach’s Department of Environment and Sustainability. “This collaboration with the College of Engineering on this project gives us a new perspective on how to design our community, using the latest techniques and theories. We expect the students to deliver designs that will enhance and showcase the city’s sustainability and resiliency efforts.”

For students, the collaboration is an opportunity to work with a real client on projects with multiple stakeholders and complex requirements. “Students from all different engineering majors are participating in this project,” aid Michelle Stanley, an undergraduate student in the department’s five-year Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degree program. “We are incorporating innovative designs and technology not used in today’s buildings to save costs and resolve such pressing issues as resiliency and rising sea levels.”

“The city of Miami Beach is one of the nation’s most forward-thinking on the topic of sustainability,” said College of Engineering Dean Jean-Pierre Bardet. “This represents an incredible opportunity to work with a client on the forefront of this engineering frontier. I expect that our students and faculty will learn from the city while also sharing new ideas and cutting-edge perspectives with the city.”

About the three projects:

Maurice Gibb Memorial Park is located on the waterfront in the Sunset Harbour neighborhood. The city has charged the students with upgrading the park’s existing marine patrol and indoor/outdoor community multipurpose space, designing a water-taxi stop and new stormwater management pump station, and integrating a new living shoreline with existing seawalls. The students’ designs will include an environmental lab for tracking air and water quality as well as real-time weather and transportation data. The park’s operation must be sustained by renewable energy.

For the Fire Station No. 1 project, the students will design a use for the land that currently holds the fire station, which the city has proposed relocating. The students may choose to preserve the current site or propose a new structure and/or land use for this site, which is in a low-lying historic district. The city is interested in a number of potential uses, including affordable housing, a parking garage that may be converted into affordable housing in the future, an office/retail/residential mixed-use project, a resiliency demonstration lab or a wastewater treatment/reclamation facility. The design must also integrate a wastewater pump station located adjacent to the firehouse.

The Byron Carlyle Theater, on Miami Beach’s 71st Street commercial corridor, is currently used as storage space by the city. The adjacent O-Cinema is in use as a theater. The city is interested in some type of mixed-use project that includes a theater or cultural arts center. It may be a retail/restaurant/office project, one that combines a cultural arts center and residential tower, or it might combine a theater, exhibition hall and community education center. The city is particularly interested in uses that include affordable housing for the local workforce. It is also encouraging on-site vegetable gardens and a sustainability and resiliency demonstration lab.

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page More NewsComments Off

Tags: , ,

University of Miami Hosts First Neural Engineering Symposium


Special to UM News

From left are Jonathan Wolpaw, W. Dalton Dietrich, Ozcan Ozdamar, and Daniel S. Rizzuto.

The University of Miami hosted its first Neural Engineering Symposium on October 13 to promote collaborations among research, educational, and industry programs for this rapidly growing discipline. Ozcan Ozdamar, professor and chair of the College of Engineering’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, and W. Dalton Dietrich, scientific director of The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, served as co-directors of the symposium, which was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering and The Miami Project with support from the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

More than 100 attendees from various departments and schools participated in the one-day event, held in the Lois Pope LIFE Center. Researchers discussed more than 50 posters, and a number of invited speakers from the University of Miami, University of Pittsburgh, University of Central Florida, University of Florida, and Florida International University presented their most recent work.

Jonathan Wolpaw, director of the National Center for Adaptive Neurotechnologies at the New York State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center, delivered the keynote address on the development of EEG-based brain-computer interfaces that can restore communication and control to people who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury and other disorders.

In another lecture, Daniel S. Rizzuto, director of Cognitive Neuromodulation at the University of Pennsylvania, reviewed current research in the development of brain stimulation therapies for patients with memory impairments as part of the DARPA RAM Project.

The meeting was coordinated by Karin Scarpinato, assistant provost for research, with the following interdisciplinary program committee members: Fabrice Manns, Suhrud Rajguru, Abhishek Prasad, Monica Perez, Vittorio Porciatti, and Michael Hoffer. The symposium was structured to enhance collaborations throughout the University and between relevant programs within the state of Florida to enhance research and educational initiatives comprising the biomedical engineering and neuroscience communities.

The symposium was supported in part by industry sponsors and the Department of Biomedical Engineering and The Miami Project. Future conferences are planned along with a new University of Miami Institute for Neural Engineering that will position the University for funding opportunities requiring established programs that integrate engineering and neuroscience for the assessment and treatment of neurological disorders. This initiative also will be critical for attracting the next generation of trainees to Miami who wish to make a career in this exciting technological discipline.

Posted in NewsComments Off

Tags: ,

College of Engineering, School of Architecture Receive NSF Grant to Study Resiliency of Coastal Cities


UM and Virginia Tech researchers will collaborate and investigate the resiliency of neighborhoods

By Barbara Gutierrez
UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (October 5, 2016) – How resilient are Miami and Miami Beach? Could they survive the brunt of a major natural disaster? Could the built environment and infrastructure in those coastal cities withstand Category 5 hurricane-force winds and rising sea levels?

The answers to these questions and many others could soon be found by a team of researchers from the University of Miami’s College of Engineering and School of Architecture, who, along with scientists from Virginia Tech, have received a $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to assess the infrastructures of those two municipalities and perhaps make them more resilient.

Starting in January and with the help of a social scientist and a computer scientist from Virginia Tech, the UM researchers will study neighborhoods in Miami and Miami Beach to determine how they work from both a physical and social perspective.

“We will look at how neighborhoods work and see what their typical features and structure are and how they contribute towards or against resiliency as well as quality-of-life objectives,” said UM Professor of Architecture Sonia Chao, one of the principal investigators on the Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes (CRISP) project.

The goal is to create new holistic paradigms of resilient urban and community design for coastal cities through the development of a human-centered computational framework, Chao added.

“We will integrate the social science and the urban design to create meta-models and achieve anticipatory resiliency,” said Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos, assistant professor in the College of Engineering’s Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, and lead investigator of the project. “Our goal is to address the questions of what could happen if an area is hit by a major disaster and what will the effect of anticipatory measures be.”

An innovative flexible modeling and computational framework for simulation and optimization will be developed to help answer those questions, according to Wangda Zuo, assistant professor in the College of Engineering.

“The project is highly interdisciplinary,” said Chao, director of UM’s Center for Urban and Community Design. “That cross-pollination and its implied layering of data and of vantage points, naturally yields a more robust and comprehensive product, which in turn can better afford community leaders with effective resiliency strategies.”

Throughout the two-year study and after its completion, researchers will hold a series of seminars in collaboration with decision-makers and practitioners from the cities of Miami and Miami Beach. They will also hold an exhibition at the Miami Frost Museum of Science to raise awareness and promote research on coastal resiliency.

 

Posted in NewsComments Off

  • Features
  • Tags
  • Popular
  • Subscribe
  • Subscribe to the Veritas RSS Feed
    Get updates to all of the latest Veritas posts by clicking the logo at the right.

    You can also subscribe to specific categories by browsing to a particular section on our site and clicking the RSS icon below each section's header.

UM Facebook

UM Twitter