Tag Archive | "miller school of medicine"

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Felicia Marie Knaul First Economist Admitted to Mexican National Academy of Medicine


UM News

Felicia-Knaul-Mexican-Academy

Academy Vice President Teresita Corona, left, and President Armando Mancilla Olivares, right, formally induct Felica Marie Knaul into the Mexican National Academy of Medicine.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (July 6, 2017)—The University of Miami’s first lady, Felicia Marie Knaul, one of the hemisphere’s leading health care researchers, scholars, and advocates, has been selected for membership into the prestigious Mexican National Academy of Medicine.

Knaul, the director of the University of Miami Institute for Advanced Study of the Americas and professor at the Miller School of Medicine, is the first economist admitted to the academy, which was founded in 1864 to improve the health and needs of the Mexican population. She joins her husband, UM President Julio Frenk, the former health minister of Mexico, who was admitted to the academy in 1989. In addition, Knaul’s father-in-law, Dr. Silvestre Frenk, is an honorary academy member and served as its president in 1976.

This highly selective academy has admitted just over 1,100 members through its 150 years of existence. Knaul’s nomination, which represents a great honor and opportunity to serve and participate in the objectives of the health system in Mexico, acknowledges her professional trajectory, as well as her academic and research contributions, both in Mexico and globally, and opens new opportunities for collaboration between UM and Mexican researchers and clinicians.

An international health and social sector economist who has worked extensively in Latin America, Knaul has produced more than 190 academic and policy publications, including several papers on Mexico and health reform in The Lancet, where she co-authored the Commission Report on Women and Health. She currently chairs the Lancet Commission on Global Access to Palliative Care and Pain Control, which is slated to publish a major report in late 2017.

New academy member  Felicia Marie Knaul, with her father-in-law Silvestre Frenk, who served as the academy's president in 1976.

New academy member Felicia Marie Knaul, with her father-in-law Silvestre Frenk, who served as the academy’s president in 1976.

Knaul has strong ties and dedication to the health sector of Mexico. She founded the Mexican nonprofit Cáncer de Mama: Tómatelo a Pecho, which undertakes policy-oriented research and promotes advocacy, awareness, early detection and palliative care initiatives for breast cancer throughout Latin America. Since 1993, she has led a group of researchers anchored at the Mexican Health Foundation focused on health systems and health economics. She is also Honorary Research Professor of Medical Sciences at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico (INSP).

“I am honored to have been inducted into the National Academy of Medicine of Mexico and reaffirm my commitment to advancing health research and advocating for health in the Americas,” Knaul said. “I look forward to forging even stronger links between the University of Miami and the stellar research community dedicated to health and health care in Mexico. ”

The induction ceremony for new members took place on June 28 in Mexico City.

 

 

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The Fine Art of Healing


ArtofHealing

Medical, nursing, and physical therapy graduate students come to the Lowe to observe and discuss art—and enhance patient safety.

Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (June 21, 2017)—Medical, nursing, and physical therapy graduate students gathered at the Lowe Art Museum last week as part of a unique study program that hones their observation and communication skills—while reflecting on art.

Part of the University of Miami’s annual Patient Safety Week, the Fine Art of Health Care program developed at the Lowe is based on Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), a methodology that invites participants to enhance their sensitivity, empathy, communication, and teamwork, which in turn improves patient outcomes.

“Participants are always surprised at what they discover beyond their initial impressions of what they see,” said Hope Torrents, the Lowe’s director of the program, now in its fourth year. “Additionally, they learn to communicate about their observations with sensitivity and in collaboration with their peers, which can only benefit their patients.”

While many programs around the country incorporate visual art into medical education, the Lowe program is singular in that it convenes students from different medical disciplines who one day will need to work together.

More than 300 students spent part of last week in small groups, observing and discussing pieces of art in the museum’s galleries, and focusing on the connections between examining art and examining a patient. The exercise is valuable, Torrents says, because ambiguity in art is similar to the uncertainty of a patient’s illness. Different perspectives and interpretations can help to enhance the understanding of a work of art, just as multiple perspectives support a more accurate patient diagnosis.

Hierarchy doesn’t exist when the students walk into the museum. The playing field is leveled, and all interpretations and perspectives are welcomed.

Now a surgical resident in Chicago, Miller School of Medicine graduate Benjamin Lemelman was asked to share his thoughts about the Lowe program with the students who attended last week’s session. He applauds it for breathing arts into the sciences.

“As you focus on a painting or sculpture or photograph, you will: Observe. Listen. Communicate. Acknowledge. Connect. Substantiate. Lead. Affirm. Be silent. Disagree. And JUST BE,” Lemelman wrote in a message. “This is what’s missing from medicine. We get so focused; we get lost. We can lose sight of what matters. What is meaningful. Why we entered health care in the first place.”

In an age where insightful communication is compromised by social media and stimulation overload, VTS and the Lowe program are now recognized as a highly effective strategy to develop the empathic and observational skills fundamental to so many industries—from law enforcement to air traffic controllers to human resources.

 

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SEEDS: Reproducibility in Science


Special to UM News

05-01-17-Reproducibility-Symposium-608x342

Panelists discuss one of the greatest challenges in contemporary science—the failure to reproduce or replicate research results.

MIAMI, Fla. (April 25, 2016)—One of the greatest challenges in contemporary science—the failure to reproduce or replicate research results—was tackled by a first-ever symposium that linked reproducibility and the responsible conduct of research.

The SEEDS “You Choose” Awards and the Miller School’s Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy presented “Reproducibility in Science: Writing, Data and the Growth of Knowledge” on April 24 at the Mailman Center for Children Development, with a keynote talk by Elizabeth Iorns, Ph.D., founder and CEO of the California-based Science Exchange and co-director of its Reproducibility Initiative.

“It is rare and reassuring to see institutional leadership take such a supportive role” in fostering reproducibility, Iorns said during a subsequent panel discussion with John Bixby, Ph.D., vice provost for research and professor of pharmacology and neurological surgery; Dushyantha T. Jayaweera, M.D., executive dean for research and research education and professor of medicine; and Joyce M. Slingerland, M.D., Ph.D., associate director for translational research at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, professor of medicine, and director of the Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute.

The program was chaired and the panel was moderated by SEEDS grant recipient Joanna Johnson, Ph.D., director of writing in the College of Arts and Sciences, who described her work on a project that identifies poor, boastful, and hedging scientific prose as a potential contributor to failures of reproducibility.

What has been called a “crisis” in science, repeated failures to reproduce complex and costly experiments is thought to be an obstacle to public trust in science, especially worrisome in times of budget uncertainty.

Iorns discusssed ways of measuring and incentivizing reproducible research, and included results from the first replication studies published by the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology. Iorns was an assistant professor at the University of Miami before starting Science Exchange in 2011. Bixby, Jayaweera, and Slingerland addressed efforts at UM to improve reproducibility and made clear that such efforts are an important component of the responsible conduct of research—and a key element of National Institutes of Health compliance rules for academic institutions.

SEEDS (A Seed for Success) “You Choose” Awards support investigator-initiated activities that enhance the awardee’s community and career. The event was co-sponsored by the Miami Clinical and Translational Science Institute.

For more information about SEEDS, please contact Marisol Capellan, SEEDS manager, at mailto:mcapellan@miami.edu.

 

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Public Health Graduate Students Showcase Their Work


Special to UM News

Showcase Group Photo

The winners of the showcase with Interim Dean Laurence B. Gardner, in white coat, and, to the left, J. Sunil Rao, interim chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences.

MIAMI, Fla. (March 3, 2017)—A select group of graduate students at the Miller School of Medicine had the opportunity last week to highlight their efforts to tackle some of the world’s most pressing and complex public health problems.

The 46 students took part in the 2017 Annual Public Health Graduate Student Showcase and Reception, held at the Don Soffer Clinical Research Center. It was the fifth year for the event, which provides a stage for the students to display posters that represent highlights from their field experiences, capstone projects, and thesis projects.

The participating students were this year’s recipients of the prestigious Springboard, Global Health Scholar, Public Health Travel, and Miami, Israel, Science and Health (MISH) Fellowship awards, and nominees from the Department of Public Health Sciences. The students are part of the Public Health Department’s M.D./M.P.H., M.S.P.H, and M.P.H. programs.

Winners were selected from each category based on content, methodology, and oral presentation.

The winners are:

  • Global Health Scholar Award— Sarah Simko, M.D./M.P.H. Class of 2019
    • Project: Community Analysis and Patient Education in Bocas del Toro, Panama
    • Advisor: Nick Cuttriss, M.D., M.P.H.
  • MISH Award— Nadia Abouhana, M.P.H. Class of 2017
    • Project: Raising Awareness About Women’s Heart Disease in Israel
    • Advisor: Tatiana Perrino, Psy.D.
  • Public Health Travel Award— Xeniamaria Rodriguez, M.S.P.H. Class of 2017
    • Project: Assessing Perceptions of Healthcare Professionals on the Warning Signs Associated with Dengue in Pediatric Hospitals in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
    • Advisor: Viviana Horigian, M.D.
  • Springboard Award — Karyn Meshbane, M.D./M.P.H. Class of 2017
    • Project: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Toward Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Among Women Experiencing Homelessness
    • Advisor: Erin Kobetz, Ph.D., M.P.H.

 

Department of Public Health Sciences Special Recognition:

  • Layla Bouzoubaa, M.S.P.H. Class of 2017
  • Aliyah Gauri, M.S.P.H. Class of 2016
  • Vivek Singh, M.S.P.H. Class of 2016
  • Roxanne Williams, M.P.H. Class of 2016

 

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UM Investigators Win $13M in State Zika Research Grants

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UM Investigators Win $13M in State Zika Research Grants


Special to UM News

The Florida Department of Health announced Feb. 1 the award of 12 grants totaling $13,170,784 from the 2016-17 Zika Research Grant Initiative to investigators at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and the University of Miami Health System. The grants are more than half of the $25 million state fund supporting a total of 34 Zika research projects at UM and nine other institutions.

Florida Governor Rick Scott said, “I am proud to announce the recipients of these important research grants today. While we are currently in winter months when Zika is not as prevalent, we must remain vigilant and continue to do everything we can to help protect pregnant women and their developing babies. I look forward to seeing the innovation and progress of Florida’s world-class research institutions as we continue to work together in the fight against Zika and to find a vaccine.”

State Surgeon General and Secretary Dr. Celeste Philip said, “I am grateful for Governor Scott’s leadership that enables us to provide researchers in Florida funds to expand the body of knowledge related to Zika, particularly in the areas of prevention and effects on infants and children.”

“Despite the time pressures related to the Zika Research Grant Initiative, investigators from the Miller School of Medicine and across the state responded with projects that have the potential to quickly advance both science and benefit to patients,” said Daniel Armstrong, Ph.D., Director of the Mailman Center for Child Development and Chair of the Florida Biomedical Research Advisory Council. “It is clear that the Miller School, UHealth and other Florida investigators are leading in innovation and impact, and increased funding support is needed to bring the best of science to patients who will benefit.”

Laurence B. Gardner, M.D., interim Dean of the Miller School of Medicine, credits the leadership of Dushayantha Jayaweera, M.D., Executive Dean for Research, in encouraging faculty to submit proposals for research funding. “It’s a reflection of the high quality of our faculty that we had so many successful applications,” Gardner said.

The Zika Research Grant Initiative focused on vaccine development, innovative diagnostic testing or therapeutics, and health effects of Zika, and included discovery science, clinical studies, screening and prevention, and dynamic change team science studies. UM investigators were funded for work in all of these areas, and include:

• Sylvia Daunert, Pharm.D., M.S., Ph.D., Excma.Dra., Lucille P. Markey Chair of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: “Antibody-based Zika diagnostics,” $1,141,585

• Natasa Strbo, M.D., D.Sc., research assistant professor of microbiology and immunology: “Development and testing of novel secreted GP96-Ig Zika virus (ZIKV) vaccine,” $981,901

• Emmalee S. Bandstra, M.D., professor of pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology: “Health effects of Zika virus,” $1,989,654

• Sapna Deo, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology: “Rapid RNA test for Zika virus,” $199,280

• Gaurav Saigal, M.D., professor of clinical radiology: “Characterization of Zika-positive and exposed children using enhanced MRI techniques and correlations with neurodevelopmental outcomes,” $1,141,457

• Ramzi Younis, M.D., professor of otolaryngology: “Early diagnosis and rehabilitation for craniofacial disorders in congenital Zika syndrome,” $1,140,125

• Glen N. Barber, Ph.D., professor and chair of cell biology: “Evaluation of novel vaccines that prevent Zika infection,” $1,141,582

• Claudia A. Martinez, M.D., associate professor of medicine: “Cardiovascular complications related to Zika virus infection,” $963,109

• Ivan Gonzalez, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics: “Evaluation of infants for Zika related end organ damage: A team science approach,” $1,989,654

• Mario Stevenson, Ph.D., professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases: “Identification of the duration of ZIKVpersistence to guide reproductive health decisions,” $1,141,582

• Shanta Dhar, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology: “Nano-formulations of anti-helminthic drugs for Zika therapy and prevention,” $1,141,582

• Mark E. Sharkey, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medicine: “Development of a rapid diagnostic assay for Zika virus infection,” $199,273

The grant programs are administered by the Florida Department of Health and implemented by the Biomedical Research Advisory Council. All of the grants were externally and independently peer reviewed by scientific experts.

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