Tag Archive | "Momentum2"

Tags: ,

School of Architecture Awarded Knight Grant to Create ‘Third Places’


Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (April 16, 2015)—The School of Architecture has received $650,000 from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation for its plan to bring “third places”— community spaces, marketplaces, incubators and training centers—to two underserved Miami neighborhoods.

The Third Place Project will create spaces that provide resources and support to entrepreneurs, creatives, and civic leaders in these neighborhoods, which have not yet been selected, as a way to foster their ideas and break down barriers. The project also will help transform these neighborhoods and create opportunities for local businesses by establishing inexpensive spaces for startups and hubs for arts, culture, and entertainment. The grant supports Momentum2: The Breakthrough Campaign for the University of Miami.

“A major challenge in the Miami metro area is the disconnect between extraordinarily wealthy neighborhoods and boom areas and long-struggling urban neighborhoods such as Allapatah, Little Haiti, and Opa-locka,” said Charles Bohl, associate professor and the director of the graduate program in Real Estate Development + Urbanism at the School of Architecture. “The Third Place Project is designed to draw on the unique cultures, social capital, and entrepreneurial talent in these neighborhoods and establish focal points – ‘third places’ capable of attracting people to visit these neighborhoods and participate in their local economies.”

“By activating neighborhoods with a high rate of entrepreneurial activity but few resources, we can bridge gaps in Miami’s innovation ecosystem and ensure a constant diversity of ideas,” said Matt Haggman, Knight Foundation program director for Miami. “The Third Place Project will grow and foster the unique character and qualities of these neighborhoods, bringing the ideas of entrepreneurs, artists, and others into the forefront and making Miami more of a place where ideas are built.”

The Third Place Project will combine expertise from the School of Architecture in architecture and placemaking with University of Miami programs in business and social entrepreneurship. Other university departments involved in the Third Place Project include the Center for Urban and Community Design, the Office of Civic and Community Engagement, as well as business startup and support programs at the School of Business Administration. The project also will support weeklong residencies with nationally recognized “civic innovators” who will come to Miami and work with students, faculty, local entrepreneurs, and nonprofits.

The University project team will work with local nonprofits and other interested parties to identify and secure sites that have the best potential to serve as gathering places. Architecture faculty and students will help adapt existing buildings, or create inexpensive, moveable incubator structures—“pop-up” buildings—to house entrepreneurs and vendors. Incubator structures will be arranged to create market places in public spaces or main streets that showcase the mix of art, commerce, food, and entertainment.

Dozens of vendors, artists, and entrepreneurs will receive training and other opportunities through the project. The incubator spaces created by the project will provide inexpensive space for startups in each community, and expand economic opportunities for local nonprofits and local development organizations. The project also will train nonprofit place managers to continue curating, marketing, and managing these places to sustain the project.

“The School of Architecture has a long history of helping to reshape and revitalize the South Florida community,” said Rodolphe el-Khoury, dean of the School of Architecture. “We are pleased that Knight Foundation has chosen to support this unique project that will have a lasting impact on communities in need of assistance.”

As defined by sociologist Ray Oldenberg, “third places” are the essential, informal public gathering places of great neighborhoods and communities. They are the cafes, taverns, public markets, and main streets where people from all walks of life come together. In poorer, ethnically distinct neighborhoods these places also have provided opportunities for local entrepreneurs to celebrate the unique art, culture, cuisine, crafts, architecture, and commerce of their people. In gateway cities, “third places” such as Little Italy in New York, Chinatown in San Francisco, and Little Havana in Miami, have become destinations for an endless stream of visitors who help foster the local economy.

The Third Place Project is currently evaluating project sites and is slated to begin work during the 2015-2016 academic year.

Support for The Third Place Project forms part of the Knight Foundation’s efforts to invest in Miami’s emerging innovators and entrepreneurs as a tool to build community, while fostering talent and expanding economic opportunity. Over the past two years, Knight has made more than 100 investments in entrepreneurship in South Florida.

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page More News, Priority: Home Page TeaserComments (0)

Knight Foundation Grant to Help Fund New Recital Hall

Tags: ,

Knight Foundation Grant to Help Fund New Recital Hall


By Julia Berg
Special to UM News

Frost.Recital.Hall

The generous gift will enable the Frost School of Music to move forward with the final design and construction of a “high-tech recital hall befitting its reputation.”

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (March 20, 2015) — The Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music at the University of Miami was awarded a $7.5 million grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation to name and support construction of a new John S. and James L. Knight Recital Hall at the Frost School of Music, on UM’s Coral Gables campus.

Announced by Alberto Ibargüen, president and CEO of the Knight Foundation, at a March 8 community gathering at the Perez Art Museum Miami, the generous gift will be  combined with other donor pledges, including $2 million from the Paul J. DiMare Foundation and $1.2 million from Dorothy and David Weaver, to  enable the Frost School of Music to move forward with the final design and construction of the estimated $15 million project.

Knight Foundation’s naming gift also puts the Frost School of Music over its $40 million fundraising goal for Momentum2: The Breakthrough Campaign for the University of Miami.

The Frost School, Ibargüen said, is already considered one of the top music schools in the country and will now “build a high-tech recital hall befitting its reputation.”

He announced the gift in conjunction with a total $25 million Knight Foundation investment in South Florida that also includes $5 million for the Perez Art Museum Miami, and $5 million for the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami. The balance will be allocated to fund challenge seed grants via the Knight Arts Challenge in South Florida through 2018.

“Great art defines and lifts the soul of a community. The arts create a sense of place and help bind us to each other with common experience. They help us explain the way we feel and represent who we are,” Ibargüen said. “Knight’s goal is to help build the community we all want to live in, a community where art is general and available to everyone, in all of our neighborhoods.”

The new Knight Recital Hall at the Frost School of Music, which is planned to seat approximately 200, will be designed for live acoustic and recorded music presentations, live streaming, multi-camera video projection, and other high-tech capabilities that will help meet the growing interactive performance needs of students and faculty of the Frost School, as well as the surrounding community.

The school presents more than 350 high-quality concerts, recitals, and events each academic year.

“This incredible endorsement from Knight Foundation will enable the Frost School of Music to build its vision of the recital hall of the future, with emphases on how to bring young audiences to classical and other treasured art music, partner with other arts organizations both regionally and nationally to premiere interactive multi-media creations, and broadcast the creativity of our students and faculty in groundbreaking ways,” said Shelly Berg, dean of the Frost School of Music.

Knight Foundation’s generosity has recently funded other key institutions in the Miami region, including a naming gift for the John S. and James L. Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, and major support for New World Symphony, Miami City Ballet, and Miami International Film Festival. Through the Knight Arts Challenge it continues to fund grassroots artists and arts organizations annually “that are providing fresh and innovative work so that everyone has a chance to make their idea a reality.”

The Frost School of Music was a recipient of a $500,000 Knight Arts Challenge grant three years ago to build its Henry Mancini Institute’s HMI: Outbound community outreach music program, to bring high-quality genre-blending chamber music programming to Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and numerous public schools in Miami-Dade County.

The University of Miami recently dedicated its new Patricia Louise Frost Music Studios, a 41,089-square-foot twin-building complex featuring 77 multi-purpose chamber music and teaching studios, two extra-large studios, a reception and information center, and a furnished breezeway. Designed by award-winning architects Yann Weymouth and HOK and built by Skanska USA, the facility is touted as the first building project in Coral Gables designed to achieve LEED Platinum certification, with sustainable features such as energy-efficient windows, rooftop solar panels, and cisterns that reduce water and electricity usage.

The complex was made possible by the benefactors, Phillip and Patricia Frost, whose landmark gift back in 2003 renamed UM’s music school in their honor. Featuring a new grand entrance into the school, the studios honor Patricia Frost’s lifelong commitment to music education as an elementary school principal and higher education advocate.

Julia Berg can be reached at 305-284-4895.

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page TeaserComments Off

Coastal Construction Funds Design Studio Building for School of Architecture

Tags: ,

Coastal Construction Funds Design Studio Building for School of Architecture


The Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building is being designed by Miami's world-renowned architecture firm Arquitectonica.

The Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building is being designed by Miami’s world-renowned architecture firm Arquitectonica.

By Annette Gallagher
Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 23, 2015) – Coastal Construction, a major builder in South Florida, has pledged $3.5 million to construct a state-of-the-art design studio building at the University of Miami School of Architecture. The gift will support Momentum2: The Breakthrough Campaign for the University of Miami.

Tom Murphy Jr., president and CEO of Coastal Construction, is passionate about supporting education in architecture and, in fact, got his start while a UM student, working on fraternity houses.

“My family has been building in Florida for over 60 years,” Murphy said. “Learning to design buildings using the latest technology in a collaborative environment is critical to being able to create cities and communities that will last. My family is proud to be able to provide this facility for UM students to learn to build, to create, and to work together.”

The Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building will be LEED-certified and include studios to accommodate about 120 students. A fabrication lab and modern workstations, designed to enable advanced digital production, will be included as well. A lounge, computer lab, presentation areas, review spaces, and offices are additional amenities. The building is being designed by world-renowned Miami architecture firm Arquitectonica, by a design team led by School of Architecture adjunct faculty member Raymond Fort and Arquitectonica principal Bernardo Fort-Brescia, who moved to Miami in 1975 to teach at the School of Architecture. The facility will occupy about 20,000 square feet, including outdoor workspace and an outdoor jury area, when completed.

“We are determined to provide our students with state-of-the-art facilities that sustain our traditions and enable innovation,” said Rodolphe el-Khoury, dean of the UM School of Architecture. “I can’t think of a better learning and working environment than the Studio Building—elegantly designed and masterfully engineered to house a field of activities under one sweeping roof —where our talented students can collectively immerse themselves in our studio culture. We are grateful to Tom Murphy and Coastal Construction for enabling us to take that culture to the next level.”

 

Posted in News, Priority: Slider Feature ItemComments Off

Tags:

Faculty and Staff Support the U: Wellness Center Accountant Keeps UM Moving Forward


Chris.Booth

Chris Booth

Christopher Booth says he owes the University of Miami a debt he can never repay. “I met my wife Melissa here when she was a student employee at the Patti and Allan Herbert Wellness Center,” says Booth, now a budget analyst at the Coral Gables center. Booth tries, though, by donating to the Department of Athletics’ scholarship fund as well as to United Way. “I want to help our teams succeed against the bigger schools in the Atlantic Coast Conference,” he says.

Growing up in West Virginia, Booth enjoyed baseball, hockey, and competitive roller-skating. He came to UM in 1994, earned a bachelor’s degree in accounting, and has worked at the Herbert Wellness Center since the day it opened in 1996. “Initially, I was a membership assistant, and I came on board full time in the spring of 1998,” he says. Now, Booth is in charge of purchasing, budget analysis, and managing daily cash operations for the center, which is open seven days a week.

“Our University has made a great investment in supporting healthy lifestyles,” he says, “and the Herbert Wellness Center is a wonderful benefit to the UM community.”

Along with working out four or five times a week, Booth enjoys watching ’Canes basketball, baseball, and football games with his wife, who earned her bachelor of arts in 2001, and his sister, J-Me Booth, another ’Cane who earned her bachelor of business administration in 2000. “We try to go to as many games as we can—even when I have to get up early for work,” he says.

Looking back, Booth is glad the U has been central to his life for the past 20 years—and he remains determined to at least try to pay off that debt. “All of us who work here are contributing to advance our University’s mission of educational excellence,” he says. “I believe that we should all give back in some way, large or small, to help keep UM moving forward.”

 

 

Posted in FeaturesComments Off

Tags: , ,

The Lowe Dedicates New Art Research Center to Hands-On Learning


Special to UM News

ARC-Dedication

UM alumna Stella Holmes, third from left, is honored at the dedication ceremony for the new Art Research Center made possible by her generosity. Standing with her are, from left, Senior Director of Development Adriana F. Verdeja, UM President Donna E. Shalala, and Lowe Art Museum Director Jill Deupi.

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 19, 2015)—The new Stella M. Holmes Art Research Center (ARC) was officially dedicated in the heart of the College of Arts and Sciences’ Lowe Art Museum last Thursday, giving UM students even more unique opportunities for hands-on learning about the museum’s world-class collection.

“The Art Research Center will allow student curators in ArtLab to see and feel artifacts from the cultures they are studying more intimately than ever before,” said Holmes, a UM alumna and supporter whose generosity launched the museum’s innovative ArtLab series in 2009. “First-hand experience is a very valuable tool in museum studies programs, because it helps students to understand the soul of the art through investigation of its origins.”

The ARC’s walls are lined with built-in, museum-grade display cases that showcase a variety of objects, while smart technology makes the most of electronic resources and the Internet. More cases line the corridor adjacent to a classroom, engaging visitors before they enter the ARC. The area also has been redesigned to allow a direct view into the Lowe’s object storage, allowing guests to see a large number of pieces that are not currently on display. Designed for active learning, the ARC will host enhanced programming for all of the Lowe’s visitors.

“It’s a new capstone in our educational offerings,” said Jill Deupi, Beaux Arts director and chief curator. “We are thrilled with the ARC, which allows us to continue to expand and enhance our capacity to engage directly with our audiences.”

Home to a world-class collection of nearly 19,000 objects spanning 5,000 years of human history, the Lowe has long been committed to providing opportunities for the firsthand experience of works of art and enrichment of the community through education about arts and culture.

The phenomenal success of ArtLab, which touches the students involved, the Lowe’s 40,000 visitors each year, and countless others who access digital copies of the catalogs online, inspired the Lowe and Holmes to create the ARC, allowing even greater interaction and experience with the museum’s remarkable cultural and educational assets.

Led by a UM faculty member, ArtLab participants spend a full academic year delving into designated themes, which have included Spanish Colonial Art, the art of indigenous Panama, the convergence of Eastern and Western ideas in contemporary Japanese art, differing points of view in Islamic art, and the history of printmaking.

In addition to the direct study of objects in the Lowe’s collections, ArtLab students enjoy off-site immersive experiences, which in the past have included field research in Panama and Peru.

ArtLab culminates each spring with the curation and installation of a focus exhibition and a companion catalog authored by the students. This show remains on view in a prominent gallery in the Lowe (the Richard B. Bermont Family Focus Gallery) for a full year, allowing museum visitors to learn from participants’ investigative efforts.

In addition to Holmes’ generosity, support for the ARC was provided by Beaux Arts, the Rubin – Ladd Foundation, the Jensen Endowment, and the Coleman Foundation.

Posted in NewsComments Off

  • Features
  • Tags
  • Popular
  • Subscribe
  • Subscribe to the Veritas RSS Feed
    Get updates to all of the latest Veritas posts by clicking the logo at the right.

    You can also subscribe to specific categories by browsing to a particular section on our site and clicking the RSS icon below each section's header.

UM Facebook

UM Twitter