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Cindy Munro Appointed Dean of School of Nursing and Health Studies


CINDY MUNRO

Cindy Munro

The University of Miami has appointed inventor and nursing leader Cindy Munro as the new dean of  its School of Nursing and Health Studies.

By UM News

Cindy Munro, an accomplished health care researcher and a leader in the field of nursing, has been named the new dean of the University of Miami’s School of Nursing and Health Studies.

Munro is currently associate dean of research and innovation at the University of South Florida College of Nursing. Prior to joining USF in 2011, she was the Nursing Alumni Endowed Professor in the School of Nursing at Virginia Commonwealth University.

“Nurses are frontline partners in offering the highest quality of patient-centered integrated health care,” said UM President Julio Frenk. “Dr. Munro’s extensive experience and commitment to innovation and invention aligns with the mission of SONHS to share health knowledge and provide service focused on patient safety to our community and communities across the globe.”

Munro’s appointment was announced by President Frenk and Jeffrey Duerk, UM’s executive vice president and provost, who joined UM earlier this month.

“I am immensely impressed with Dr. Munro’s qualifications and her research in health care,” said Duerk. “I look forward to working with her as she builds upon the School’s global reputation for providing a first-class nursing education.”

Munro, who in February received the 2017 Leadership in Research Award by the Southern Nursing Research Society, focuses her research on the relationship between oral health and the prevention of systemic disease. Her work has been supported by more than $8 million in funding, and she recently received a grant of nearly $2 million from the National Institute of Nursing Research to conduct studies on the prevention of delirium in critically ill adults. She holds three patents, including an international patent for a vaccine to prevent streptococcal endocarditis.

Munro’s work has helped change clinical practice and reduce health care costs by addressing hospital-acquired infections.

“I have always admired the focused research and expertise of the faculty at the School of Nursing and Health Studies,” Munro said. “I look forward to joining the team and building on the School’s success and educating the next generation of leaders in nursing care and in health studies.”

She will begin her new role on August 15.

Munro received her Ph.D. in Nursing from Virginia Commonwealth University and a Post Master’s Adult Nurse Practitioner degree, also from VCU. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from Millersville University of Pennsylvania and a Master of Science in Medical Surgical Nursing from the University of Delaware. She is a licensed registered nurse in Florida and Virginia and is a board-certified adult nurse practitioner.

Co-editor in chief of the American Journal of Critical Care, Munro has published numerous articles and has been recognized for her writing with the Apex Award for Publication Excellence in Editorial and Advocacy Writing in 2016 and the American Society of Healthcare Publication Editors 2016 Best Commentary Silver Award.

Munro is a member of the USF Chapter of the National Academy of Inventors and is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing, the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

 

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The Fine Art of Healing


ArtofHealing

Medical, nursing, and physical therapy graduate students come to the Lowe to observe and discuss art—and enhance patient safety.

Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (June 21, 2017)—Medical, nursing, and physical therapy graduate students gathered at the Lowe Art Museum last week as part of a unique study program that hones their observation and communication skills—while reflecting on art.

Part of the University of Miami’s annual Patient Safety Week, the Fine Art of Health Care program developed at the Lowe is based on Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), a methodology that invites participants to enhance their sensitivity, empathy, communication, and teamwork, which in turn improves patient outcomes.

“Participants are always surprised at what they discover beyond their initial impressions of what they see,” said Hope Torrents, the Lowe’s director of the program, now in its fourth year. “Additionally, they learn to communicate about their observations with sensitivity and in collaboration with their peers, which can only benefit their patients.”

While many programs around the country incorporate visual art into medical education, the Lowe program is singular in that it convenes students from different medical disciplines who one day will need to work together.

More than 300 students spent part of last week in small groups, observing and discussing pieces of art in the museum’s galleries, and focusing on the connections between examining art and examining a patient. The exercise is valuable, Torrents says, because ambiguity in art is similar to the uncertainty of a patient’s illness. Different perspectives and interpretations can help to enhance the understanding of a work of art, just as multiple perspectives support a more accurate patient diagnosis.

Hierarchy doesn’t exist when the students walk into the museum. The playing field is leveled, and all interpretations and perspectives are welcomed.

Now a surgical resident in Chicago, Miller School of Medicine graduate Benjamin Lemelman was asked to share his thoughts about the Lowe program with the students who attended last week’s session. He applauds it for breathing arts into the sciences.

“As you focus on a painting or sculpture or photograph, you will: Observe. Listen. Communicate. Acknowledge. Connect. Substantiate. Lead. Affirm. Be silent. Disagree. And JUST BE,” Lemelman wrote in a message. “This is what’s missing from medicine. We get so focused; we get lost. We can lose sight of what matters. What is meaningful. Why we entered health care in the first place.”

In an age where insightful communication is compromised by social media and stimulation overload, VTS and the Lowe program are now recognized as a highly effective strategy to develop the empathic and observational skills fundamental to so many industries—from law enforcement to air traffic controllers to human resources.

 

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Nurse Scientist to Advance NINR’s Mission

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Nurse Scientist to Advance NINR’s Mission


Cianelli

Rosina Cianelli

UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 9, 2017)Rosina Cianelli, an associate professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies who teaches and conducts research in women’s health, health disparities, and international health, is among 15 new ambassadors selected by the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research (FNINR) to advance the  mission of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). Part of the National Institutes of Health, the NINR is dedicated to nursing research that promotes and improves the health of individuals, families, and communities.

Selected from a national pool of applicants, Cianelli and the other new ambassadors  join 15 current ambassadors who focus specifically on educating Congressional leaders about high-impact and cost-effective treatments and quality-of-life enhancements that emanate from nursing science. Ultimately, the goal is to advance research funding to ensure the training of nurse scientists at a time of major scientific breakthroughs, and to promote the NINR strategic plan for for improving the wellbeing of Americans across the human lifespan.

“We are exquisitely positioned to use science generated by highly trained nurses to generate cures, reduce symptoms and side effects, and promote health and wellbeing aimed at individuals, families, and communities,” said Karen Drenkard, president of the FNINR.

“In the last year,” she continued, “we have had important conversations with key Congressional leaders who are understanding and valuing how nurses function as scientists, individually and on integrated research teams. With the large number of newly elected officials nationally and at the state level, the ambassadors will join others, including our board, to bolster awareness and action for those discoveries that save lives, advance health, and reduce costs.”

An independent, non-profit organization, the FNINR seeks to support research-based nursing practice by educating health care professionals, Congress, and other appointed and elected officials, as well as the public in general, about the advances made through nursing research and its benefits to society.

 

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M.D./M.P.H. and Nursing Students Prepare for the Unthinkable


Special to UM News

disasterexercise1

Nursing and M.D./M.P.H. students assumed the roles of first responders and patients during disaster drills at the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education.

MIAMI, Fla. (December 12, 2016) — The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education doesn’t usually take care of patients, but on one recent Saturday it served as a makeshift hospital for M.D./M.P.H. and nursing students working together on a complicated, frightening possibility: How would they respond to a terrorist attack at Marlins Park?

Triage for the disaster drill was in the lobby, a large emergency department was set up downstairs, and other areas included a medical/surgical floor, pediatrics, an intensive care unit, and OB/GYN.

“We ran two scenarios so that each student had the opportunity to play both a provider and a victim role,” said Ivette Motola, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Prehospital and Emergency Healthcare and assistant director of the Gordon Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “In the first scenario — a bombing and active shooter at the stadium — every area in the hospital had to figure out how to get the patients in, how to treat them, whether to send them home — the same thing that happened at the Boston Marathon bombing. The students who weren’t health care providers in the first scenario were the victims or family members, and then in between we flipped them.”

In the second scenario, the active shooter came to the hospital, Motola said. “The students had to manage sheltering in place, and some were given the role of incident commander and public information officer. We were a little concerned about the level of the challenge and having them all have active roles, but it came together beautifully.”

Casey McGillicuddy, a second-year M.D./M.P.H. student who wants to pursue a career in disaster medicine, shared Motola’s enthusiasm for the experience. “This was a great opportunity to take away the silos between medical and nursing students,” she said. “Nurses will be such a huge part of the rest of my career – it was great to learn from each other.”

Directing the exercise from the School of Nursing and Health Studies was Susana Barroso-Fernandez, Ph.D., R.N., director of simulation operations for the school’s International Academy for Clinical Simulation and Research.

“Nurses are the largest body of first responders in any disaster,” Barroso-Fernandez said. “When you look at a situation of this magnitude, you can pick up a nursing journal or read an article or watch the news, but unless we give them the experience of the front line and put them in that situation, they graduate not knowing what it feels like.

“In this day and age, unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if something happens, it’s when.”

The exercise was McGillicuddy’s capstone project, so she was involved in planning from the beginning. “After the Orlando massacre and the Boston Marathon, we were interested in doing an active-shooter exercise,” she said. “The roles had to be very carefully planned — for example, ‘You are a gunshot victim, right lower leg, and are experiencing shock.’ ”

Thinking about the unthinkable is critical for medical and nursing students, Motola said. “Because disasters don’t happen very often it’s hard to get people to focus on preparing for it, but the idea is to have health care providers who have thought about it and are prepared for it.”

Emergency management professionals who participated in the exercise stressed that message, McGillicuddy said. “They said some of our decisions weren’t necessarily right or wrong, but should it occur in real life we’ll be ready, and we won’t be panicking. It’s always better to have action than inaction.”

“Nursing school is an amazing experience,” Barroso-Fernandez said. “This exercise gives you an opportunity to step back. Because even if you’re working at a hospital during a disaster, it’s a different experience than coming in for your regular shift.”

Many of the nursing students will qualify to join the Medical Reserve Corps after graduation and be available for assignment during a disaster. Building relationships with the M.D./M.P.H. students was valuable preparation for those and other experiences, Barroso-Fernandez said. “At the end of the day what we all want is to enhance patient care and improve patient safety, whatever the scenario.”

 

 

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Anne Norris Named Interim Dean of School of Nursing and Health Studies


UM News

Anne Norris, associate dean for the Ph.D. program and professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies, has been named interim dean of the school, effective January 3, 2017. Dean Nilda (Nena) Peragallo Montano, who has led the school for 13 years, announced in August that she will resign at the end of the fall semester to become dean of the School of Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A member of the faculty since 2014, Norris is an internationally recognized nursing scientist, specializing in sexual and reproductive health, particularly the role of culture and other social influences on behavior, as well as statistics and measurement.

“As a renowned nurse, educator, and scholar, Dr. Norris is an outstanding faculty member to fill this important role while we conduct the search for a new dean,” said Thomas J. LeBlanc, executive vice president and provost. “She will help ensure continuity of the school’s excellence during this transitional period.”

The author of more than 90 scholarly publications, Norris was inducted earlier this year into Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society’s International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame. This highly prestigious distinction recognizes her pioneering research, in which she frequently incorporates cutting-edge technology, and her mentorship of nurse educators and scientists. She is the 2011 recipient of the Mary Cash Award for Outstanding Contribution to Cultural Diversity in Nursing and Health Care and a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

“I’m looking forward to building on Dean Peragallo’s legacy,” Norris said.

Norris earned her Ph.D. in nursing and psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has held faculty and leadership positions at The Ohio State University, Boston College, and the University of Central Florida. She is the principal investigator for JUEGA! (PLAY!), a study funded by a $3.3 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health that is testing the efficacy of her Mighty Girls program in 20 Miami-Dade County public middle schools. Mighty Girls combines classroom sessions with an avatar-based computer game to teach adolescent girls about choices, consequences, and assertiveness in risky situations.

 

 

 

 

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