Tag Archive | "school of nursing and health studies"

Nurse Scientist to Advance NINR’s Mission

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Nurse Scientist to Advance NINR’s Mission


Cianelli

Rosina Cianelli

UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (February 9, 2017)Rosina Cianelli, an associate professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies who teaches and conducts research in women’s health, health disparities, and international health, is among 15 new ambassadors selected by the Friends of the National Institute of Nursing Research (FNINR) to advance the  mission of the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). Part of the National Institutes of Health, the NINR is dedicated to nursing research that promotes and improves the health of individuals, families, and communities.

Selected from a national pool of applicants, Cianelli and the other new ambassadors  join 15 current ambassadors who focus specifically on educating Congressional leaders about high-impact and cost-effective treatments and quality-of-life enhancements that emanate from nursing science. Ultimately, the goal is to advance research funding to ensure the training of nurse scientists at a time of major scientific breakthroughs, and to promote the NINR strategic plan for for improving the wellbeing of Americans across the human lifespan.

“We are exquisitely positioned to use science generated by highly trained nurses to generate cures, reduce symptoms and side effects, and promote health and wellbeing aimed at individuals, families, and communities,” said Karen Drenkard, president of the FNINR.

“In the last year,” she continued, “we have had important conversations with key Congressional leaders who are understanding and valuing how nurses function as scientists, individually and on integrated research teams. With the large number of newly elected officials nationally and at the state level, the ambassadors will join others, including our board, to bolster awareness and action for those discoveries that save lives, advance health, and reduce costs.”

An independent, non-profit organization, the FNINR seeks to support research-based nursing practice by educating health care professionals, Congress, and other appointed and elected officials, as well as the public in general, about the advances made through nursing research and its benefits to society.

 

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M.D./M.P.H. and Nursing Students Prepare for the Unthinkable


Special to UM News

disasterexercise1

Nursing and M.D./M.P.H. students assumed the roles of first responders and patients during disaster drills at the Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education.

MIAMI, Fla. (December 12, 2016) — The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education doesn’t usually take care of patients, but on one recent Saturday it served as a makeshift hospital for M.D./M.P.H. and nursing students working together on a complicated, frightening possibility: How would they respond to a terrorist attack at Marlins Park?

Triage for the disaster drill was in the lobby, a large emergency department was set up downstairs, and other areas included a medical/surgical floor, pediatrics, an intensive care unit, and OB/GYN.

“We ran two scenarios so that each student had the opportunity to play both a provider and a victim role,” said Ivette Motola, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Division of Prehospital and Emergency Healthcare and assistant director of the Gordon Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. “In the first scenario — a bombing and active shooter at the stadium — every area in the hospital had to figure out how to get the patients in, how to treat them, whether to send them home — the same thing that happened at the Boston Marathon bombing. The students who weren’t health care providers in the first scenario were the victims or family members, and then in between we flipped them.”

In the second scenario, the active shooter came to the hospital, Motola said. “The students had to manage sheltering in place, and some were given the role of incident commander and public information officer. We were a little concerned about the level of the challenge and having them all have active roles, but it came together beautifully.”

Casey McGillicuddy, a second-year M.D./M.P.H. student who wants to pursue a career in disaster medicine, shared Motola’s enthusiasm for the experience. “This was a great opportunity to take away the silos between medical and nursing students,” she said. “Nurses will be such a huge part of the rest of my career – it was great to learn from each other.”

Directing the exercise from the School of Nursing and Health Studies was Susana Barroso-Fernandez, Ph.D., R.N., director of simulation operations for the school’s International Academy for Clinical Simulation and Research.

“Nurses are the largest body of first responders in any disaster,” Barroso-Fernandez said. “When you look at a situation of this magnitude, you can pick up a nursing journal or read an article or watch the news, but unless we give them the experience of the front line and put them in that situation, they graduate not knowing what it feels like.

“In this day and age, unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if something happens, it’s when.”

The exercise was McGillicuddy’s capstone project, so she was involved in planning from the beginning. “After the Orlando massacre and the Boston Marathon, we were interested in doing an active-shooter exercise,” she said. “The roles had to be very carefully planned — for example, ‘You are a gunshot victim, right lower leg, and are experiencing shock.’ ”

Thinking about the unthinkable is critical for medical and nursing students, Motola said. “Because disasters don’t happen very often it’s hard to get people to focus on preparing for it, but the idea is to have health care providers who have thought about it and are prepared for it.”

Emergency management professionals who participated in the exercise stressed that message, McGillicuddy said. “They said some of our decisions weren’t necessarily right or wrong, but should it occur in real life we’ll be ready, and we won’t be panicking. It’s always better to have action than inaction.”

“Nursing school is an amazing experience,” Barroso-Fernandez said. “This exercise gives you an opportunity to step back. Because even if you’re working at a hospital during a disaster, it’s a different experience than coming in for your regular shift.”

Many of the nursing students will qualify to join the Medical Reserve Corps after graduation and be available for assignment during a disaster. Building relationships with the M.D./M.P.H. students was valuable preparation for those and other experiences, Barroso-Fernandez said. “At the end of the day what we all want is to enhance patient care and improve patient safety, whatever the scenario.”

 

 

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Anne Norris Named Interim Dean of School of Nursing and Health Studies


UM News

Anne Norris, associate dean for the Ph.D. program and professor in the School of Nursing and Health Studies, has been named interim dean of the school, effective January 3, 2017. Dean Nilda (Nena) Peragallo Montano, who has led the school for 13 years, announced in August that she will resign at the end of the fall semester to become dean of the School of Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

A member of the faculty since 2014, Norris is an internationally recognized nursing scientist, specializing in sexual and reproductive health, particularly the role of culture and other social influences on behavior, as well as statistics and measurement.

“As a renowned nurse, educator, and scholar, Dr. Norris is an outstanding faculty member to fill this important role while we conduct the search for a new dean,” said Thomas J. LeBlanc, executive vice president and provost. “She will help ensure continuity of the school’s excellence during this transitional period.”

The author of more than 90 scholarly publications, Norris was inducted earlier this year into Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society’s International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame. This highly prestigious distinction recognizes her pioneering research, in which she frequently incorporates cutting-edge technology, and her mentorship of nurse educators and scientists. She is the 2011 recipient of the Mary Cash Award for Outstanding Contribution to Cultural Diversity in Nursing and Health Care and a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing.

“I’m looking forward to building on Dean Peragallo’s legacy,” Norris said.

Norris earned her Ph.D. in nursing and psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has held faculty and leadership positions at The Ohio State University, Boston College, and the University of Central Florida. She is the principal investigator for JUEGA! (PLAY!), a study funded by a $3.3 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health that is testing the efficacy of her Mighty Girls program in 20 Miami-Dade County public middle schools. Mighty Girls combines classroom sessions with an avatar-based computer game to teach adolescent girls about choices, consequences, and assertiveness in risky situations.

 

 

 

 

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Nursing Faculty Tapped for Profession’s Highest Honor

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Nursing Faculty Tapped for Profession’s Highest Honor


ortega-alves

Johis Ortega and Steve Alves

Special to UM News

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (November 3, 2016) — Two School of Nursing and Health Studies faculty members, Johis Ortega and Steve Alves, were inducted last month as fellows of the American Academy of Nursing, at the academy’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.  The academy comprises nurse leaders in education, management, practice, policy, and research, and fellows include hospital and government administrators, college deans, and renowned nurse scientists worldwide.

“I am delighted to welcome this superb cohort of talented clinicians, researchers, policy leaders, educators, and executives as they join the ranks of the nation’s leading nursing and health care thought leaders,” Academy President Bobbie Berkowitz said. “We look forward to … working with them to advance the academy’s mission of transforming health policy and practice by applying our collective nursing knowledge.”

The academy’s highly selective criteria for the nursing profession’s highest honor include evidence of significant contributions to nursing and health care, and sponsorship by two current academy fellows. Applicants are reviewed by a panel of elected and appointed fellows, and selection is based on the extent the nominee’s nursing career has influenced health policies and the public’s well-being.

“Selection for AAN fellowship is an amazing honor and a high point of my nursing career,” said Ortega, who was selected for his contributions to global nursing education capacity and workforce development, and for helping to develop the U.S. nurse practitioner role. “I look forward to the opportunity to join the academy’s distinguished fellows in advancing health policy and practice through the nursing profession.”

Alves, who is recognized for his research on occupational stress and restrictive scope of practice in nurse anesthetists, said, “I am honored to have been selected as a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing; being recognized for my contributions by the academy is clearly one of the highest accomplishments in my career. It is my belief that nursing practice, education, and policy are interdependent and have shaped my role as a researcher, educator, and practitioner.”

As new fellows, Ortega and Alves are now entitled to use the FAAN (Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing) credentials after their name.

 

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Dean Peragallo Montano to Step Down

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Dean Peragallo Montano to Step Down


By Robert C. Jones Jr.
UM News

PeragalloCORAL GABLES, Fla. (August 4, 2016) — Nilda (Nena) Peragallo Montano, who fostered monumental growth and significant improvement in the curriculum, facilities, and programs of the University of Miami’s School of Nursing and Health Studies during her 13 years as dean, will step down at the end of the fall 2016 semester.

An internationally recognized nursing scientist, Peragallo Montano will become dean of the School of Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“Nena’s leadership and the contributions of the school’s outstanding faculty led to many significant accomplishments,” said Thomas J. LeBlanc, UM’s executive vice president and provost, noting that Peragallo Montano “has elevated the School of Nursing and Health Studies into the ranks of the nation’s best.”

Recalling how she was welcomed into the University family in 2003, Peragallo Montano said, “I came here with a vision: to leverage the singular strengths of the School of Nursing and Health Studies to elevate its national and global standing, promote academic excellence, and prepare health care leaders for the 21st century. Through the remarkable dedication, talent and generosity of our students, faculty, community partners and friends, we have achieved this dream. I leave the U with great pride and a firm confidence in the spectacular future that lies ahead for the School of Nursing and Health Studies.”

During her tenure, Peragallo Montano helped usher in a new era for the nursing school, leading its transition from a small, cramped World War II-era building located on the edge of the Coral Gables campus to a modern 53,000-square-foot, four-story facility with smart classrooms and a clinical simulation and research area where students now practice real medical crises on high-tech patient mannequins that can register a heartbeat and other vital signs and even sweat.

Today, the M. Christine Schwartz Center for Nursing and Health Studies, a building for which Peragallo Montano helped raise the remaining funding needed to make it possible, houses the school’s faculty, staff, and students under one roof.

Long a proponent of simulation-based scenarios and the benefits such activities offer in preventing mistakes before nursing students work in live clinical situations, Peragallo Montano pushed for the creation of a Simulation Hospital at UM. Next year, the school will open such a facility, bringing her efforts to fruition.

Stepping into her role as dean at a time when an acute shortage of nurses at the state, national, and global levels began to affect the health care sector at alarming rates, Peragallo Montano instituted new programs to address the crisis. Under her leadership, for example, the school launched an Accelerated B.S.N. Program that allows students with bachelor’s degrees in other fields to earn a nursing degree in a year.

She spearheaded expansion of the school’s curriculum in other areas as well, introducing Doctor of Nursing Practice and Bachelor of Science in Health Science programs as well as Florida’s first B.S.N.-to-D.N.P. in nurse anesthesia track and South Florida’s first Bachelor of Science in Public Health degree.

During her deanship, the school’s student enrollment tripled, its M.S.N. and D.N.P. programs are now ranked among U.S. News & World Report’s 2017 Best Graduate Schools, and it emerged as a leading recipient of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants—it is No.1 in Florida and 22nd nationwide in NIH funding among nursing schools.

Peragallo Montano ramped up the school’s academic and clinical practice standards, which led to record passing rates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. In 2012, 98 percent of UM’s nursing graduates passed the exam on their first try.

With a career devoted to improving the health status of minorities and other underserved populations, she expanded the school’s prominence in the global health arena, leading the 2007 birth of its Center of Excellence for Health Disparities Research, or El Centro, made possible by a NIH grant of more than $7 million. In 2012, El Centro received renewed NIH funding through 2017, and the nursing school was re-designated a Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Nursing Human Resources Development and Patient Safety.

Peragallo Montano is an inductee of the International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame of the Sigma Theta Tau International nursing honor society and a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She also is on HispanicBusiness magazine’s list of the nation’s 100 Most Influential Leaders.

LeBlanc will appoint a committee to conduct a national search for her successor.

 

 

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