Tag Archive | "The Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy"

New Master’s Degree in Exploration Science Caters to the Next Generation of Explorers

Tags: ,

New Master’s Degree in Exploration Science Caters to the Next Generation of Explorers


With a focus on expedition-driven scientific inquiry, the new Master's Degree in Exploration Science is geared toward the next generation of explorers. Photo credit: Wes Skiles, National Geographic Society.

With a focus on expedition-driven scientific inquiry, the new Master’s Degree in Exploration Science is geared toward the next generation of explorers. Photo credit: Wes Skiles, National Geographic Society.

The Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have teamed up to launch a new Master’s Degree in Exploration Science. Offered as part of the innovative Master of Professional Science program, the new track teaches critical exploration skills, providing students with the know-how to conduct expedition-driven scientific inquiry and field-based communication.

Read the full story

Posted in News, Priority: Home Page TeaserComments Off

Explorer of the Year

Tags:

Explorer of the Year


Kenny Broad speaks at the National Geographic Society's Evening of Exploration gala event, where he received the Explorer of the Year Award.

Environmental anthropologist Kenny Broad and the late underwater photographer Wes Skiles were honored by the National Geographic Society at its inaugural Evening of Exploration gala event, held on June 23 in Washington, D.C. Broad, associate professor of marine affairs and policy and director of UM’s Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, and Skiles were named “Explorers of the Year,” a new award presented in recognition of their extraordinary achievements in exploring and documenting the blue holes of the Bahamas in 2010. Broad and the Skiles family each received a Rolex Explorer timepiece.

Also honored at the event: musician and environmental activist Jack Johnson, who received the “Arts Ambassador for the Environment Award,” presented to an individual in the entertainment field who has demonstrated leadership in environmental and cultural conservation by elevating issues of sustainability and inspiring audiences to care about the planet. The National Geographic “Chairman’s Award” was presented to IBM for significantly advancing knowledge of the world through its research partnership with National Geographic on the Genographic Project, which is mapping the migratory history of humans.

 

Posted in Freeze Frame, Priority: Home Page TeaserComments Off

Exploring blue holes

Tags: ,

Exploring blue holes


In a National Geographic-sponsored presentation augmented with vivid images of his deepwater dives into the Bahamas’ famed blue holes, Rosenstiel School Associate Professor Kenny Broad last Saturday gave a standing room-only audience at UM’s Storer Auditorium an in-depth look at these mysterious caverns, which could shed new light in fields such as natural history, microbiology, and climate change.

Kenny Broad discusses the scientific importance of blue holes at last Saturday's National Geographic-sponsored program.

On Saturday, September 25, the University of Miami became only the fifth university to be visited by National Geographic as part of its Young Explorers program. By 7:15 p.m. not one seat was left in Storer Auditorium for the scheduled 7:30 lecture by National Geographic Society (NGS) and North Face explorers John Francis, VP of Research, Conservation and Exploration at NGS; Kenny Broad, NGS Emerging Explorer and UM professor; and North Face athlete Peter Athans, who were on the Coral Gables campus to describe and share footage from adventures both underwater and in exotic locales around the globe.

The evening’s free, standing-room-only public presentation was the culmination of a daylong workshop for South Florida students, also held at UM. National Geographic’s Young Explorer grants support 18-to-25-year-olds in their pursuit of research, exploration, and conservation-based field projects. “We chose the University of Miami because of its long history with the National Geographic Society, which has awarded 51 grants to 21 scientists, beginning as far back as 1960,” said Francis. “Interdisciplinary approaches, like those of UM’s Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy, have grown significantly in recent years, yielding new ideas and exciting one-of-a-kind projects to support.”

Read the full story

Posted in FeaturesComments Off

  • Features
  • Tags
  • Popular
  • Subscribe
  • Subscribe to the Veritas RSS Feed
    Get updates to all of the latest Veritas posts by clicking the logo at the right.

    You can also subscribe to specific categories by browsing to a particular section on our site and clicking the RSS icon below each section's header.

UM Facebook

UM Twitter